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Crayford Temple Grove

History

History

History Vision

At Haberdashers' Crayford Primary we intend for our children to develop a greater understanding and knowledge of how and why the world, our country, different cultures and especially our local community have developed and changed over time. This will then help the children to reflect and appreciate how the past affects the present and future events in a positive light and articulate what we can learn about ourselves in the 21st century. This fits in well with our school vision as it helps to develop empathy and teaching history with a global focus develops a deep understanding of the past and how it has shaped present day. 

Our History curriculum ensures that subject specific skills are taught from the use of our progression of skills map and knowledge overview. We have prioritised key aspects of local history and global history to provide a well-rounded history curriculum for our students. A sense of belonging permeates the school, and this is enhanced by opportunities to explore our local history.

There is opportunity for the children to progress and repeat the skills they have acquired to ensure that they are embedded in their key stage. These skills and knowledge are then built upon in the next key stage to ensure that the children are well rounded individuals who possess an understanding of the past and how it impacts the world they live in today.

History Overview

History Overview 2022-2023

 

Autumn

Spring

Summer

N 3-4

Marvellous Me & Look at Me

[Aut1]

Talking about family members and family routines, and exploring how children have changed since they were babies

 

 On the move

[Spr1]

Exploring occupations related to transport

On the farm

[Spr2]

Exploring occupations related to farming

 

 

 

Reception

Me and my world

[Aut1]

Talking about different family members and their roles in more depth

My heroes

[Aut1]

Comparing heroic characters from the past and present

 

Castles, knights and dragons

[Spr1]

Learning about historical figures in castles and comparing images of  Queen Elizabeth II with that of historical queens

 

Where we live

[Sum1]

Learning about familiar aspects of our locality from the past, using historic photographs and memories of older adults

 

Year 1

What was life like for people in the past?

An introduction to the discipline of history with my family tree, and how schools, toys and the way we communicate have changed over time

 

How did people travel in the past?

The development of transport by land, sea, air and space and the roles of key individuals

 

The history of healthcare 

Understanding healthcare in the past; using pictures and videos and comparing Florence Nightingale and Mary Seacole

Year 2

Significant Women

[Aut 1]

The impact Emmeline Pankhurst and Greta Thunberg have had in society.

 

Great Fire of London

[Aut 2]

Life in London 1660s, and the causes and effects of the Great Fire of London

 

Local history: community & family

Exploring how our community has changed over time through the lens of flight: Amelia Earhart/The First Transatlantic Flight (Alcock and Brown)

 

 

Comparison of explorers

The similarities and differences between the lives of Sacagawea and Katherine Johnson

 

Year 3

European history:

Prehistoric Britain

How settlements, food, communities and beliefs changed across the Palaeolithic, Mesolithic, Neolithic, Bronze Age and Iron Age

African history:

Ancient Egypt

The role of the pharaoh in Ancient Egypt, and examining pyramids, mummification and conquest in the Egyptian empire

 

 

Year 4

European history:

Ancient Greece

[Aut 1]

The contributions made by the city-states of Ancient Greece, and how these are influence our lives today

 

North American history:

Ancient Maya

[Aut 2]

Understanding life for the Ancient Maya, and comparing this with that of the Ancient Greeks and Ancient Egyptians

Asian history:

Early Islamic Civilisation

The establishment of Baghdad and the contributions Islamic scholars in the House of Wisdom made to science, maths, medicine and technology

 

European history:

 

Ancient Rome

 

The development of the Roman Empire, how it changed over time, and how these changes affected people differently

 

Year 5

European history:

Local History

Why is Charles Swaisland famous today?

How has fabric been important in our community?

How has migration shaped our community?

 

 

European history:

Roman Empire in Britain

The Roman conquest of Britain, and how the Romans maintained power in Britannia

Global history:

WWI (Suffragists/Suffragette movement).

[Sum 1]​

The Suffragette movement in Britain and the impact its had on women in society today.

Global history:

Quest for knowledge

 [Sum 2]

An exploration of a range of civilisations across the world and across time, and how they developed and shared knowledge

Year 6

European history:

Settlement by 
Anglo-Saxons

[Aut 1]

Using artefacts identified at Sutton Hoo to explore what life was like for Anglo-Saxons

European history:

Viking age

[Aut 2]

Understanding who the Vikings were and how their reputation has changed over time; making arguments as to whether they deserve a violent reputation

 

Global history:

WWII

How key events during WWII shaped the world we live in today.

Global history:

Power, empire and democracy

A short introduction to the rise and fall British Empire, and its legacy in Britain from the 1960s to today

 

History Progression Map

Nursery 3-4

Autumn

Building on prior understanding​

Pupils should be exposed to​

How knowledge will be built upon​

Substantive

  • Say who lives in their house​
  • Name their immediate family​
  • Mimic familiar adults engaged in everyday tasks​
  • Talk about the roles of adults they live with​
  • Name and talk about their extended family​
  • Talk about how they have changed from being a baby​
  • Talk freely about family and home life​
  • Say how children and adults are different​
  • Recall special times, such as birthdays, that they remember in their life​
  • Talk about occupations of people they live with (Rec Aut1)​
  • A family tree shows the relationships between different generations in a family  (Y1 Aut)​

Disciplinary

  • Chronology: Say how many years old I am​
  • Change & continuity: Over time, some things about a person (me) stay the same and some things change​
  • Chronology: Use vocabulary like, then, now, before, after, a long time ago (Rec Aut)​
  • Change & continuity: Over time, some things about a place stay the same and some things stay the same (Rec Sum)​

VCs

  • Community & family: Talk about the lives of the people in my community, including my family, and their roles in society​
  • Community & family: My local community was different for families at different times in history (Y1)​

 

Spring

Building on prior understanding​

Pupils should be exposed to​

How knowledge will be built upon​

Substantive

  • Show an interest in occupations linked to transport​
  • Trains (and other vehicles) can be powered by steam, diesel or electricity.​
  • We can travel in many ways today (Y1 Spr)​
  • People in the past could travel less far than we can today (Y1 Spr)​
  • Transport options have changed in living memory (Y1 Spr)​
  • Options to travel in space, in the air, by car or by train have changed over time (Y1 Spr)​

Disciplinary

VCs

  • Community & family: Talk about the lives of the people in my community, including my family, and their roles in society​
  • Community & family: My local community was different for families at different times in history (Y1)​

 

Reception

Autumn

 

Building on prior understanding​

Pupils should be exposed to​

How knowledge will be built upon​

Substantive

  • Talk about the roles of adults they live with (N3-4 Aut1)​
  • Talk about occupations of people they live with​
  • Learn about a hero from recent history (i.e. last ~100 years), who may also be important in the local community​
  • Celebrations of special days look different today compared to when our parents and grandparents were children​

Disciplinary

  • Change & continuity: Over time, some things about a person (me or a hero) stay the same and some things change (N3-4 Aut1)​
  • Historical evidence: Look at photographs and images to see how life was different in the past​
  • Change & continuity: Historians can describe changes that have happened over time​
  • Chronology: Use vocabulary like now, then, before, after, a long time ago​
  • Historical evidence: Historians learn about the past by interpreting sources (Y1 Aut)​
  • Change & continuity: Over time, some things about a place stay the same and some things stay the same (Rec Sum)​
  • Chronology: Historians place events in the order in which they happened (Y1 Aut)​

VCs

  • Quest for knowledge: The technology and things we have today have not always existed​
  • Quest for knowledge: It took a long time for the knowledge that we have today to develop (Y1)​

 

Spring

Building on prior understanding​

Pupils should be exposed to​

How knowledge will be built upon​

Substantive

  • Monarchs (kings and queens) are important people who help rule a country​
  • Queen Elizabeth II is our queen today. Queen Elizabeth I and Queen Victoria were queens who lived in the past​
  • Many people lived and worked in castles in the past​
  • Knowledge of Egyptian monarchs (Y3 Spr), Ancient Greek monarchs (Y3 Sum), Maya monarchs (Y4 Aut)​

Disciplinary

  • Historical evidence: Look at photographs and images to see how life was different in the past (Rec Spr)​
  • Change & continuity: Historians can describe changes that have happened over time (Rec Spr)​
  • Chronology: Use vocabulary like now, then, before, after, a long time ago (Rec Spr)​

VCs

  • Quest for knowledge: The technology and things we have today have not always existed​
  • Power, empire and democracy: The Queen is an important person where we live​
  • Power, empire and democracy: The King or Queen in England has power to make new rules or laws (Y2)​

 

 

Summer

Building on prior understanding​

Pupils should be exposed to​

How knowledge will be built upon​

Substantive

  • The place where we live looked different at different times in history​
  • Local history of my community (Y2 Aut)​

Disciplinary

  • Change & continuity: Over time, some things about a person (me or a hero) stay the same and some things change (N3-4 Aut1)​
  • Change & continuity: Historians can describe changes that have happened over time (Rec Aut)​
  • Historical evidence: Look at photographs and images to see how life was different in the past (Rec Spr)​
  • Change & continuity: Over time, some things about a place stay the same and some things stay the same​
  • Historical evidence: Use historical maps or photographs in a plan view (Y4 Sum)​
  • Change & continuity: Some changes happen more quickly than others. The world is changing more quickly in more recent history (Y1 Spr)​

VCs

  • Community & family: Talk about the lives of the people in my community, including my family, and their roles in society (N3-4)​

 

 

 

Year 1

Autumn

Required prior knowledge​

Knowledge to be explicitly taught​

How knowledge will be built upon​

Substantive

  • Say who lives in their house, and name their immediate and extended family (N3-4 Aut1)​
  • Science: Trees are a type of plant that have a tall stem made of wood, and lots of leaves and branches (Y1 Aut)​
  • Living memory is the time that can be remembered by people who are alive today​
  • family tree shows the relationships between different generations in a family​
  • Communication/schools/toys is/are different now (the present) and before now, in living memory (the past)​
  • Transport has changed across history so that people can travel further (between and across continents) today than they could before (Y1 Spr)​

Disciplinary

  • Change & continuity: Over time, some things about a place/person stay the same and some things stay the same (Rec Sum)​
  • Historical evidence: Look at photographs and images to see how life was different in the past (Rec Aut)​
  • Chronology: Use vocabulary like now, then, before, after, and a long time ago (Rec Aut)​
  • Change & continuity: Historians can describe changes that have happened over time​
  • Historical evidence: History is the study of humans who lived in the past​
  • Historical evidence: Historians learn about the past by interpreting sources​
  • Chronology: Use vocabulary like now, then, before, after, and a long time ago​
  • Chronology: Historians place events in the order in which they happened​
  • Chronology: State whether a source shows life in the past or in the present​
  • Change & continuity: Some changes happen more quickly than others. The world is changing more quickly in more recent history (Y2)​
  • Chronology: State, with reasons,​
  •  whether one source shows life in a more or less recent time than another (Y1)​
  • Historical evidence: Primary sources are sources that were created by someone who experienced the event firsthand. Secondary sources are written about primary sources (Y2)​

VCs

  • Community & family: Talk about the lives of the people in my community, including my family, and their roles in society (EYFS)​
  • Community & family: My local community was different for families at different times in history​
  • Community & family: People in history lived in communities that look different to ours today (Y2)​

 

Spring  

Required prior knowledge​

Knowledge to be explicitly taught​

How knowledge will be built upon​

Substantive

  • Show an interest in occupations linked to transport (and farms) (N3-4 Spr1)​
  • Living memory is the time that can be remembered by people who are alive today (Y1 Aut)​
  • We can travel in many ways today​
  • Transport options have changed in living memory​
  • Apollo 11 was the mission that sent two men to walk on the Moon​
  • The Wright brothers invented the aeroplane and Bessie Coleman was the first black woman to gain her pilot’s licence​
  • Robert and George Stephenson developed the ‘Rocket’, one of the first locomotives
  • Karl Benz invented the first car, and Henry Ford developed the assembly line, which was a new way of making cars that made them affordable for everyone​
  • Options to travel in space, in the air, by car or by train have changed over time.​
  • People in the past could travel less far than we can today​
  • Michael Collins was one of the first men to travel in space to the Moon (Y2 Sum)​
  • Quest for knowledge (Y5 Sum); considering how knowledge spread and developed as people travelled further across the globe at different times in history​

Disciplinary

  • Change & continuity: Historians can describe changes that have happened over time (Y1 Aut)​
  • Historical evidence: History is the study of humans who lived in the past (Y1 Aut)​
  • Historical evidence: Historians learn about the past by interpreting sources (Y1 Aut)​
  • Chronology: Use vocabulary like now, before, after, and a long time ago​
  • (Y1 Aut)​
  • Chronology: State whether a source shows life in the past or in the present (Y1 Aut)​
  • Historical significance: Historians choose to study people or events in the past because they resulted in change​
  • Change & continuity: Some changes happen more quickly than others. The world is changing more quickly in more recent history​
  • Chronology: Recognise historical periods using arrows on a blank timeline, to begin to understand the scale of human history​
  • Chronology: State whether a source shows life in a more or less recent time than another​
  • Historical significance: Historians choose to study people or events from the past  because they were important to people at the time and/or are remembered today (Y2)​
  • Change & continuity: Changes do not follow one trajectory (Y5)​
  • Chronology: Place a small selection of sources in chronological order (Y2)​

VCs

  • Community & family: In the past, communities were smaller because people could not travel so far​
  • Quest for knowledge: Sometimes it was the contributions of important individuals that were important in advancing our knowledge (Y2)​
  • Community & family: In communities in the past, different people often had very defined roles. The earliest communities and some families had to be self-sufficient, and did everything (hunt, cook, clean, build, heal) themselves (Y3)​

 

Summer – The history of healthcare (Florence Nighingale and Mary Seacole)

Year 2

Autumn 1 - Significant women (Emmeline Pankhurst, Greta Thunberg)

Autumn 2

 

Required prior knowledge​

Knowledge to be explicitly taught​

How knowledge will be built upon​

Substantive

  • Monarchs (kings and queens) are important people who help rule a country (Rec Spr)​
  • Geography: The capital city of England is London (Y1 Spr)​
  • Before factories, most people lived in the countryside in cottages with two or three rooms. In small towns, homes were cramped and jettying was used to give people more space (Y1 Sum)​
  • 1660s London was dirty, busy, cramped, and homes were made of wood​
  • The Great Plague of 1666 meant that people lived in a locked down city in London​
  • The Great Fire of London started in a bakery in Pudding Lane
  • People only had basic equipment like fire squirtsbuckets and fire hooks to help them try and put it out​
  • It lasted just under five days and destroyed one third of London​
  • Primary and secondary sources like artefactsimages and texts – such as Samuel Pepys’ diary – can tell us about the fire​
  • The fire spread quickly because most buildings were built close together out of flammable materials; there was a strong wind; fire fighting equipment was not good enough and relied on ordinary people; and the town mayor did not act quickly enough​
  • The Great Fire of London destroyed one third of London. It killed people and made 100,000 homeless​
  • After the Great Fire of London, building regulations were introduced, a fire service was established, and a monument to the fire was built​
  • Applying knowledge of what life was like in London in the 1660s to learning about the Scientific Revolution (Y5)​

Disciplinary

  • Chronology: Recognise historical periods or events using arrows on a blank timeline, to begin to understand the scale of human history (Y1 Spr)​
  • Historical significance: Historians choose to study people or events in the past because they resulted in change (Y1 Sum)​
  • Causation: Things happen because something causes them to happen (Y1 Spr)​
  • Historical evidence: Historians learn about the past by interpreting sources (Y1 Aut)​
  • Historical evidence: Primary sources are sources that were created by someone who experienced the event firsthand. Secondary sources are about primary sources (Y2 Aut)​
  • Science: Use a Venn diagram to classify items into two or three sets based on properties (Y1 Sum)​
  • Historical significance: Historians choose to study people or events from the past because they resulted in change and/or were important to people at the time and/or are remembered today ​
  • Causation: Things happen as a result of causes. Some things have lots of causes​
  • Causation: Causes can be long-term conditions or short-term triggers​
  • Historical significance: Historians can set their own criteria for what they consider to be significant, and why it should be studied (Y4)​
  • Causation: Some things that have lots of causes that are connected in some way (Y3)​

VCs

  • Quest for knowledge: It took a long time for the knowledge that we have today to develop (Y1)​
  • Power, empire & democracy: The King or Queen in England has power to make new rules or laws​
  • Power, empire & democracy: Different places have different systems of government. Some can be autocratic; some can be democratic. The UK has a democracy (Y3)​

 

Spring

 Local history: community & family Amelia Earhart/The First Transatlantic Flight (Alcock and Brown)

Required prior knowledge​

Knowledge to be explicitly taught​

How knowledge will be built upon​

Substantive

  • The place where we live looked different at different times in history (Rec Sum)​
  • Geography: The school and community are at the local scale; countries are at the national scale; continents are at the global scale (Y1 Sum)​
  • (Varies by school)​
  • The local history unit in Year 4 allows pupils to further build on their knowledge of their local area. They will focus on the significance of an individual, a local feature, or migration in their local community (Y4 Sum)​

Year 2 teachers should liaise with their history lead or Year 4 teacher to ensure that there is no accidental duplication.​

Disciplinary

  • Historical evidence: History is the study of humans who lived in the past (Y1 Aut)​
  • Historical evidence: Historians learn about the past by interpreting sources (Y1 Aut)​
  • Chronology: Recognise historical periods using arrows on a blank timeline, to begin to understand the scale of human history (Y1 Spr)​
  • Chronology: Historians place events in the order in which they happened (Y1 Aut)​
  • Chronology: State whether a source shows life in a more or less recent time than another (Y1 Sum)​
  • Change & continuity: Over time, some things about a place stay the same and some things stay the same (Rec Sum)​
  • Chronology: Place a small selection of sources in order, from most to least recent​
  • Historical evidence: Primary sources are sources that were created by someone who experienced the event firsthand. Secondary sources are about primary sources​
  • Chronology: Use vocabulary like decade and century (Y3)​
  • Historical evidence: There are limits to what historians can learn from any collection of sources (Y3)​

VCs

  • Community & family: My local community was different for families at different times in history (Y1)​
  • Community & family: People in history lived in communities that look different to ours today (Y2 Sum)​

 

 

Summer

Required prior knowledge​

Knowledge to be explicitly taught​

How knowledge will be built upon​

Substantive

  • Science: The Moon in the sky is more visible at night (Y1 Aut)​
  • Geography: There are seven continents in the world, six of which people live on (Y1 Sum)​
  • Apollo 11 was the mission that sent two men to walk on the Moon (Y1 Sum)​
  • Sacagawea was a Shoshone (Native American) woman who lived a long time ago. She was captured by another tribe as a child and sold.​
  • Michael Collins was an American man who lived some time after Sacagawea had died. He always wanted to be a pilot and became an Air Force test pilot.​
  • Sacagawea joined the Lewis & Clark expedition to explore and make maps of North America.​
  • Michael Collins joined Apollo 11, a mission to the Moon to try and win the Space Race.​
  • Sacagawea made many contributions to her expedition, including translating Shoshone and finding food.​
  • Michael Collins piloted the Colombia and made sure that the other astronauts in the Eagle returned to Earth safely.​
  • Sacagawea was not celebrated at the time of the expedition but has been celebrated since.​
  • Michael Collins was widely praised at the time of the expedition, but many people forget that he was on Apollo 11 today!​
  • The experience of Native Americans and other indigenous peoples across the world during colonisation (Y5)​

Disciplinary

  • Chronology: State whether a source shows life in a more or less recent time than another (Y1 Sum)​
  • Historical significance: Historians choose to study people or events from the past  because they were important to people at the time and/or are remembered today (Y2 Spr)​
  • Science: Use a Venn diagram to classify items into two or three sets based on properties (Y1 Sum)​
  • Geography: A map is a drawing of a place from above (EYFS)​
  • Similarity & difference: Similarities and differences exist between two individuals who lived in the past​
  • Similarity & difference: Historians sometimes group people together to make explanations easier, but every individual in the past had similar and different experiences (Y3)​

VCs

  • Community & family: My local community was different for families at different times in history (Y1)​
  • Community & family: People in history lived in communities that look different to ours today​
  • Quest for knowledge: Sometimes it was the contributions of important individuals that were important in advancing our knowledge​
  • Community & family: In communities in the past, different people often had very defined roles. The earliest communities and some families had to be self-sufficient, and did everything (hunt, cook, clean, build, heal) themselves (Y3)​
  • Quest for knowledge: People in the past had different knowledge or beliefs to us; this does not mean that they are more ‘stupid’ than people today (Y3)​

 

Year 3

Autumn

Required prior knowledge​

Knowledge to be explicitly taught​

How knowledge will be built upon​

Substantive

  • Geography: Human settlements can be a city, town or village, depending on their size (Y1 Aut)​
  • A very long time ago, people lived in small villages, in roundhouses with just one room (Y1 Sum)​
  • Science: Natural rocks are either igneous, sedimentary or metamorphic (Y3 Aut)​
  • Science: A fossil is physical evidence of an ancient plant or animal. It could be their preserved remains, or other traces that they made when they were alive (Y3 Aut)​
  • Science: Trace fossils include imprints of a mark left by an animal, the imprint of a feather or poo (Y3 Aut)​
  • Homo sapiens have lived on Earth for a relatively short time; they shared the Earth with Neanderthals but not with dinosaurs​
  • Prehistory refers to the study of humans before there was writing​
  • Prehistoric Britain is split into the Stone Age (PalaeolithicMesolithicNeolithic), Bronze Age and Iron Age
  • Hunter-gatherers are people who travel looking for animals to hunt and plants and berries to gather​
  • Agriculture is the farming of plants (arable) and animals (pastoral) to eat​
  • Hunter-gatherer diets gradually gave way to agriculture and farming in the Neolithic period​
  • The move towards farming meant that prehistoric communities became more settledlarger and homes became more sophisticated
  • The lack of written sources mean that it is difficult to know what people believed​
  • The design of hillfortsstone circles and geoglyphs suggest that the natural world was very important​
  • Stonehenge and other stone circles are made of sedimentary and igneous rocks​
  • Grave goods suggest that people believed in an afterlife
  • Comparing prehistoric Britain with the civilisations in Ancient Egypt, and recognising that the two units overlapped in time (Y3 Spr)​
  • The similarities and differences between prehistoric communities across the world (Y5)​
  • Geography: Hunter-gatherer communities that live in the world today (Y4)​
  • Geography: The development of agriculture from subsistence to commercial (Y5)​

Disciplinary

  • Historical evidence: History is the study of humans who lived in the past (Y1 Aut)​
  • Historical evidence: Primary sources are sources that were created by someone who experienced the event firsthand. Secondary sources are about primary sources (Y2 Aut)​
  • Chronology: Use vocabulary like now, before now, a long time before now to describe periods in time (Y1 Aut)​
  • Chronology: Recognise historical periods using arrows on a blank timeline, to begin to understand the scale of human history (Y1 Spr)​
  • Historical evidence: Archaeology is the branch of history that deals with the remains of human life​
  • Historical evidence: Archaeologists study artefacts, ecofacts and features​
  • Historical evidence: There are limits to what historians can learn from any collection of sources​
  • Historical evidence: Sources do not always provide an objective account of what happened in history; historians need to consider the author and purpose and analyse it critically (Y3 Spr)​
  • Historical evidence: Archaeologists follow a similar process to scientists: Planning; Measuring & Observing; Recording & Presenting; Analysing & Evaluating (Y6)​

VCs

  • Community & family: People in history lived in communities that look different to ours today (Y2)​
  • Community & family: In communities in history, different people often had very defined roles. The earliest communities and some families had to be self-sufficient, and did everything (hunt, cook, clean, build, heal) themselves​
  • Quest for knowledge: Sometimes people’s knowledge and beliefs are based on the natural world around them. People in the past had different knowledge or beliefs to us; this does not mean that they are more ‘stupid’ than people today​
  • Community & family: Communities can be brought together by geographical location, or by a shared identity (Y4)​
  • Quest for knowledge: Knowledge was developed and shared across different civilisations across many continents (Y4)​

 

Spring

 

Required prior knowledge​

Knowledge to be explicitly taught​

How knowledge will be built upon​

Substantive

  • Geography: There are seven continents in the world, six of which people live on (Y1 Sum)​
  • Geography: Hot deserts have a very hot and dry climate (Y2)​
  • Prehistoric Britain is split into the Stone Age (Palaeolithic, Mesolithic, Neolithic), Bronze Age and Iron Age (Y3 Aut)​
  • Stonehenge and other stone circles are made of sedimentary and igneous rocks (Y3 Aut)​
  • Burials suggest that people believed in an afterlife, and reflect the lives they lived (Y3 Aut)​
  • Ancient Egyptians lived in Egypt (Africa) at the same time as prehistoric Britons lived in Britain (Europe).​
  • The Nile is a river that flows through Egypt and other countries in Africa. The Ancient Egyptians relied on the Nile for farming and transport​
  • An empire is a group of countries or places ruled by one person​
  • An autocracy is place where one person or one group can rule exactly as they want to forever​
  • Ancient Egypt was an empire, led by an autocratic pharaoh
  • Ancient Egyptians believed that the pharaoh was half manhalf god
  • The Ancient Egyptians believed in an afterlife called the Field of Reeds. They used the Book of the Dead to navigate there​
  • The Ancient Egyptians mummified bodies to preserve them for the afterlife​
  • The Ancient Egyptians built and buried pharaohs inside huge pyramids, along with all the items they would need for the afterlife. Pyramids were built using sedimentary rock​
  • Egyptians used hieroglyphics to share stories with future generations​
  • The Ancient Egyptians made a range of developments in surgery and science​
  • Pharaohs fought battles outside of Egypt and received tributes and riches from the people they conquered, like the Kingdom of Kush at some points​
  • Ancient Maya also built pyramids to honour their gods but, unlike Egyptians, built temples on top of them (Y4).​
  • Ancient Maya also used hieroglyphics to write (Y4).​
  • Ancient Greeks (Y3) and Romans (Y5) worshipped gods who were responsible for different parts of life.​
  • In the Roman Empire, the Imperial Cult elevated the emperor to having a god status after he died (Y5).​
  • The Ancient Maya civilisation (Y4) and the Roman Empire (Y5) were relatively autocratic civilisations.​

Disciplinary

  • Historical evidence: Primary sources are sources that were created by someone who experienced the event firsthand. Secondary sources are about primary sources (Y2 Aut)​
  • Causation: Things happen as a result of causes. Some things have lots of causes (Y2 Spr)​
  • Historical evidence: Archaeology is the branch of history that deals with the remains of human life (Y3 Aut)​
  • Causation: Some things have lots of causes that are connected in some way​
  • Historical evidence: Sources do not always provide an objective account of what happened in history; historians need to consider the author and purpose and analyse it critically​
  • Historical evidence: Historians cross-reference sources in order to build confidence (Y5)​
  • Causation: Causes can be categorised as economic, physical, institutional, social, environmental or others (Y5)​

VCs

  • Power, empire & democracy: The King or Queen in England has power to make new rules or laws  (Y2)​
  • Power, empire & democracy: Different places have different systems of government. Some can be autocratic​
  • Power, empire & democracy: Empires are large areas of land that are controlled by one person or group of people​
  • Power, empire & democracy: People get their power in different ways. For example, some are powerful because they have divine status, i.e. seen as half man or half god; some are rich; some have powerful armies​
  • Power, empire & democracy: Some places have a democracy. Not all democracies are the same. The UK has a democracy (Y3 Sum)​

 

Year 4

Autumn 1

 

Required prior knowledge​

Knowledge to be explicitly taught​

How knowledge will be built upon​

Substantive

  • Geography: Europe is made up of 50 countries; Russia is split across Asia and Europe (Y3 Sum)​
  • An empire is a group of countries or places ruled by one person (Y3 Spr)​
  • An autocracy is a system of government where one person or one group can rule exactly as they want to forever (Y3 Spr)​
  • Ancient Egypt was an empire, led by an autocratic pharaoh (Y3 Aut)​
  • The pharaoh was considered a god on Earth, and the Egyptians built pyramids to honour them after they died (Y3 Aut)​
  • A city-state is a city and the surrounding land that has its own government and identity
  • A government is the system or people who rule a place​
  • civilisation is a group of people and their society, culture and way of life.​
  • Ancient Greece was not an empire, but was made of lots of city-states like Athens and Sparta​
  • Democracy is a system of government where everyone has a say​
  • Athens developed a democracy, which was more limited than ours today​
  • Ancient Greeks used skills in architecture to build temples to honour their gods​
  • Architectural orders include DoricIonic and Corinthian, and these influences can be seen in our buildings today​
  • Ancient Greeks believed in multiple gods and wrote myths
  • The Ancient Greeks contributed knowledge that is relevant today, including medicine, science, mathematics and astronomy​
  • The Ancient Greeks borrowed and built on the ideas of other civilisations like those in Ancient Sumer and Ancient Egypt​
  • The Ancient Maya lived in city-states, but the relationships between them were generally less harmonious than those in Ancient Greece (Y4).​
  • Ancient Rome evolved from a monarchy, to a republic, dictatorship, one empire and then two empires. Some of these contained features of a democracy, but all were more autocratic (Y5).​
  • The Ancient Maya, like the Ancient Egyptians and Greeks, built temples to honour their gods. The Maya built these at the top of step pyramids (Y4).​
  • Roman gods were based on Greek gods (Y5).​
  • Isaac Newton built upon Aristotle’s philosophy to promote the scientific method, the approach to science that we still use today (Y5).​
  • Science: Aristotle developed a method for classifying plants and animals, but there are reasons why we do not use this today (Y4)​

Disciplinary

  • Similarity & difference: Similarities and differences exist between two individuals who lived in the past (Y2 Sum)​
  • Chronology: Recognise historical periods using arrows on a blank timeline, to begin to understand the scale of human history (Y1 Spr)​
  • Historical significance: Historians choose to study people or events from the past  because they were important to people at the time and/or are remembered today (Y2 Spr)​
  • Similarity & difference: Historians sometimes group people together to make explanations easier, but every individual in the past had similar and different experiences​
  • Chronology: Use vocabulary like decade and century​
  • Chronology: Describe historical periods and times using dates [AD only] and as a given number of years ago (Y4)​
  • Chronology: Use vocabulary like decade, century and millennium (Y5)​
  • Similarity & difference: Historians can consider the similarities and differences between people in two different civilisations from the past (Y4)​

VCs

  • Power, empire & democracy: Different places have different systems of government. Some can be autocratic (Y3 Spr)​
  • Power, empire & democracy: Empires are large areas of land that are controlled by one person or group of people (Y3 Spr)​
  • Power, empire & democracy: People get their power in different ways. For example, some are powerful because they have divine status, i.e. seen as half man or half god; some are rich; some have powerful armies (Y3)​
  • Power, empire & democracy: Some places have a democracy. Not all democracies are the same. The UK has a democracy​
  • Power, empire & democracy: Drivers of power can be categorised into institutional, economic, physical, intellectual and informal (Y5)​

 

Autumn 2

Required prior knowledge​

Knowledge to be explicitly taught​

How knowledge will be built upon​

Substantive

  • An empire is a group of countries or places ruled by one person (Y3 Spr)​
  • An autocracy is a system of government where one person or one group can rule exactly as they want to forever (Y3 Spr)​
  • Egyptians built pyramids to honour the pharaoh (half man half god) (Y3 Spr)​
  • Egyptians used phonetic, conceptual and pictorial hieroglyphics to share stories with future generations (Y3 Spr)​
  • A city-state is a city and the surrounding land that has its own government and identity (Y3 Sum)​
  • Ancient Greece was not an empire, but was made of lots of city-states like Athens and Sparta (Y3 Sum)​
  • Democracy is a system of government where everyone has a say (Y3 Sum)​
  • Ancient Greeks used skills in architecture to build temples to honour their gods. Ancient Greeks believed in multiple gods and wrote myths (Y3 Sum)​
  • The Ancient Greeks contributed knowledge that is relevant today, including medicine, science, mathematics and astronomy (Y3 Sum)​
  • The Maya civilisation flourished in Mesoamerica from 250 to 800. It declined after that, but descendants of the Maya live in Central America today​
  • The Maya lived in city-states ruled by kings
  • The relationships between city-states in Maya civilisation were different to those in Ancient Greece​
  • Maya worshipped multiple gods who were each responsible for something​
  • Ancient Maya sacrificed animals and sometimes humans to honour gods​
  • Maya built step-pyramids and temples to honour gods​
  • Maya cities had a plaza, temples, a ball court and sometimes an observatory​
  • Ancient Maya developed a number system and developed the concept of zero​
  • The Ancient Maya developed hieroglyphics, like the Egyptians​
  • The Maya resisted Spanish conquest but were eventually defeated in 1697. Even after that, the Maya fought to maintain their culture, language, and traditions – which still survive in descendants of the Maya today (Y5)​

Disciplinary

  • Mathematics: Compare and order numbers up to 1000 (Y3)​
  • Chronology: Use vocabulary like now, before now, a long time before now to describe periods in time (Y1 Aut)​
  • Chronology: Recognise historical periods using arrows on a blank timeline, to begin to understand the scale of human history (Y1 Sum)​
  • [Mathematics]: Number system over time has developed to include zero​
  • Similarity & difference: Historians can consider the similarities and differences between people in two different civilisations from the past​
  • Chronology: Describe historical periods and times using dates [AD only] and as a given number of years ago (up to 1000)​
  • Chronology: Place dates [AD only] on a timeline​
  • Similarity & difference: Historians should recognise the similar and different experiences that individuals from the same community have based on their age, gender, race, wealth, sexuality and other characteristics (Y5)​
  • Chronology: Recognise and use AD/BC and BCE/BC accurately (Y5)​

VCs

  • Quest for knowledge: People in the past had different knowledge or beliefs to us; this does not mean that they are more ‘stupid’ than people today (Y3)​
  • Quest for knowledge: Different civilisations across the world developed similar knowledge independently​
  • Quest for knowledge: Knowledge was developed and shared across different civilisations across many continents. Different civilisations place different values on knowledge and scientific development than others (Y4 Spr)​

 

Spring

Required prior knowledge​

Knowledge to be explicitly taught​

How knowledge will be built upon​

Substantive

  • Geography: The capital city of England is London (Y1 Spr)​
  • Science: We see when light enters our eyes (Y3 Aut)​
  • An empire is a group of countries or places ruled by one person (Y3 Spr)​
  • Ancient Egypt was an empire, led by a pharaoh (Y3 Spr)​
  • A civilisation is a group of people and their society, culture and way of life (Y3 Sum)​
  • Science: The digestive system is the group of organs that help your body digest food (Y4 Aut)​
  • Science: Role of the stomach and the small intestine (Y4 Aut)​
  • The Early Islamic Civilisation began with the founding of Islam by the Prophet  Mohammad in 610​
  • The Early Islamic Civilisation was an empire, led by the caliph.
  • The Early Islamic Empire stretched across Eastern Europe, Northern Africa and Western Asia​
  • The people of the Early Islamic Empire were connected by their common identity and religion, as well as geographical (political) boundaries​
  • Baghdad was founded in 762 and became the capital city, and it was strategically designed​
  • Knowledge and wisdom is central to Islam, and the House of Wisdom collated the knowledge of many societies and welcomed scholars of all backgrounds​
  • Early Muslim doctors and surgeons introduced key principles of medicines including holistic treatments, free hospitals and learning from each other​
  • Al Khwarizmi was a mathematician who gave us the word 'algebra' and introduced the numbers 0-9 into Europe​
  • Ibn Al Haytham proved that humans see when light enters eye​
  • In 1258, a Mongol army brutally attacked Baghdad. They killed scholars and threw books from the House of Wisdom into the river Tigris, and lots of knowledge was lost.​
  • We only know about many of the (Greek and) Roman writings and developments because they were preserved and translated by scholars in Baghdad (Y5)​
  • The Early Islamic Empire was around at the same time as the Anglo-Saxons and Vikings in England, but the two civilisations looked very different (Y6)​

Disciplinary

  • Mathematics: Compare and order numbers up to 1000 (Y3)​
  • Geography: Political maps show human boundaries and features; physical maps show physical boundaries and features (Y3 Aut)​
  • Historical significance: Historians choose to study people or events from the past  because they were important to people at the time and/or are remembered today (Y2 Sum)​
  • Chronology: Use vocabulary like decade and century (Y3 Sum)​
  • Chronology: Describe historical periods and times using dates [AD only] and as a given number of years ago (Y4 Aut)​
  • Historical significance: Historians can set their own criteria for what they consider to be significant, and why it should be studied​
  • Historical evidence: Political maps have changed over time​
  • Chronology: Convert between a year and a century​
  • Historical significance: The past is everything that has happened to everyone, but we only learn about some parts in history. The rest is known as silence (Y5)​
  • Chronology: Recognise and use AD/BC and BCE/BC accurately (Y5)​

VCs

  • Quest for knowledge: Different civilisations across the world developed similar knowledge independently (Y4 Aut)​
  • Community & family: In communities in history, different people often had very defined roles (Y3)​
  • Quest for knowledge: Knowledge was developed and shared across different civilisations across many continents​
  • Quest for knowledge: Different civilisations place different values on knowledge and scientific development than others​
  • Community & family: Communities can be brought together by geographical location, or by a shared identity​
  • Quest for knowledge: Different civilisations take different valid approaches to knowledge. Western science and the emphasis on the scientific method is not the dominant approach everywhere in the world (Y5)​

 

Summer

Required prior knowledge​

Knowledge to be explicitly taught​

How knowledge will be built upon​

Substantive

  • An empire is a group of countries or places ruled by one person (Y3 Spr)​
  • An autocracy is a system of government where one person or one group can rule exactly as they want to forever (Y3 Spr)​
  • Ancient Egyptians believed that the pharaoh was half man, half god (Y3 Spr)​
  • A civilisation is a group of people and their society, culture and way of life (Y3 Sum)​
  • Democracy is a system of government where everyone has a say (Y3 Sum)​
  • Ancient Greeks believed in multiple gods and wrote myths (Y3 Sum)​
  • The Ancient Greeks contributed knowledge that is relevant today, including medicine, science, mathematics and astronomy (Y3 Sum)​
  • The Ancient Greeks borrowed and built on the ideas of other civilisations like those in Ancient Sumer and Ancient Egypt (Y3 Sum)​
  • Ancient Rome expanded gradually from 753 BC until it peaked around AD 100; it declined from 3rd century until collapse in AD 476​
  • At its peak, the Roman Empire covered a huge area across Europe, Asia and Africa​
  • Roman citizens were plebians (poorer) or patricians (wealthy). Female citizens had very few rights compared to men.​
  • Slavery is a system where people are owned by other people. Slaves are forced to work for no money​
  • The Romans owned slaves, like the Greeks and Egyptians before them​
  • Roman slaves were the poorest people in society or prisoners of war. Roman slavery was not based on race or ethnicity
  • Ancient Rome was governed by kings, a republic, a dictatorship, one empire and then two empires
  • The head of state remained the most powerful person in Rome, and he was autocratic
  • Roman religion evolved to incorporate new beliefs as the empire expanded (e.g. Greek gods)​
  • The imperial cult elevated emperors to having a god status​
  • Many Christians were persecuted from the 1st century AD until Emperor Constantine declared tolerance for all beliefs​
  • As the Roman Empire grew, the Romans were exposed to more and more ideas from different people​
  • Roman science and technology - like roads and medicine – helped the Romans expand their empire​
  • The civilisations that came before Ancient Rome, particularly in western Asia, that contributed to Roman science and technology (Y5 Sum)​
  • British Empire and how this grew to be larger than the Roman Empire (Y6)​

Disciplinary

  • Mathematics: Order and compare numbers up to and beyond 1000 (Y3)​
  • Change & continuity: Some changes happen more quickly than others. The world is changing more quickly in more recent history (Y2 Aut)​
  • Historical evidence: Political maps have changed over time (Y4 Spr)​
  • Chronology: Use vocabulary like decade and century (Y3 Sum)​
  • Chronology: Convert between a year and a century (Y4 Spr)​
  • Change & continuity: Changes do not follow one trajectory​
  • Change & continuity: Changes can take place gradually (evolution) or rapidly and completely (revolution)​
  • Similarity & difference: Historians should recognise the similar and different experiences that individuals from the same community have based on their age, gender, race, wealth, sexuality and other characteristics​
  • Chronology: Recognise and use AD/BC and BCE/BC accurately​
  • Change & continuity: Changes do not always mean progress​
  • Similarity & difference: Make decisions about when and how it is appropriate to generalise or group individuals when describing experiences (KS3)​
  • Chronology: Describe historical periods or events using any date, and millions of years ago (KS3)​

VCs

  • Community & family: Communities can be brought together by geographical location, or by a shared identity (Y3)​
  • Community & family: Systems of slavery have existed in communities and civilisations across the world for a long time. Slaves could be taken from different communities based on their wealth​
  • Community & family: Slaves could be taken from different communities based on their race, ethnicity or gender (Y6)​

 

 

 

 

Year 5 Autumn

Required prior knowledge​

Knowledge to be explicitly taught​

How knowledge will be built upon​

Substantive

  • [One aspect of the history of the local area; varies by school (Y2 Aut)]​
  • [History of local area; varies by school]​
  • Further, more sophisticated study of the history of the local area (KS3)​

Disciplinary

  • Historical significance: Historians choose to study people or events in the past because they resulted in change (Y1 Sum)​
  • Historical significance: Historians choose to study people or events from the past because they were important to people at the time and/or are remembered today (Y2 Spr)​
  • Historical significance: Historians can set their own criteria for what they consider to be significant, and why it should be studied (Y4 Spr)​
  • Similarity & difference: Historians sometimes group people together to make explanations easier, but every individual in the past had similar and different experiences (Y3 Sum)​
  • Historical evidence: Primary sources are sources that were created by someone who experienced the event firsthand. Secondary sources are about primary sources (Y2 Aut)​
  • Historical evidence: Sources do not always provide an objective account of what happened in history; historians need to consider the author and purpose and analyse it critically (Y3 Spr)​
  • Chronology: Place a small selection of sources in order, from most to least recent (Y2 Aut)​
  • Chronology: Use vocabulary like decade and century (Y3 Sum)​
  • Chronology: Describe historical periods and times using dates [AD only] and as a given number of years ago (Y4 Aut)​
  • Chronology: Place dates [AD only] on a timeline (Y4 Aut)​
  • Chronology: Convert between a year and a century (Y4 Spr)​
  • Geography: Use a range of map types, including photographs of areas in plan/oblique view, and OS maps​
  • Historical evidence: Use historical maps or photographs in a plan view​
  • Historical evidence: Local history archives can be an invaluable source of information for historians​
  • Evaluate the usefulness of sources, recognising bias and intentions, and understanding their limitations (KS3)​
  • Analysing a wide range of sources in increasingly creative ways (KS3)​

VCs

 

Spring

Required prior knowledge​

Knowledge to be explicitly taught​

How knowledge will be built upon​

Substantive

  • Geography: The seas that surround the UK are the North Sea, the Irish Sea and the English Channel (Y2 Sum)​
  • An empire is a group of countries or places ruled by one person (Y3 Spr)​
  • Ancient Rome expanded gradually from 473 BC until it peaked around AD 100; it declined from 3rd century until collapse in AD 476 (Y5 Aut)​
  • At its peak, the Roman Empire covered a huge area across Europe, Asia and Africa (Y5 Aut)​
  • The head of state remained the most powerful person in Rome, and he was autocratic (Y5 Aut)​
  • Roman religion evolved to incorporate new beliefs as the empire expanded (e.g. Greek gods) (Y5 Aut)​
  • Roman science and technology -  like roads and medicine - was needed more and more as the empire expanded (Y5 Aut)​
  • Roman Emperor Julius Caesar tried to conquer Britain twice from 55 BC but failed; Claudius was successful in AD 43​
  • Britain was difficult for the Romans to control because it was far from the centre of the empire, it was one of many boundaries, and many Britons fought against Roman conquest​
  • Roman Britain was a diverse place, for example, the Aurelian Moors formed the earliest documented black community in the north of England​
  • The Romans kept control using disciplined armiesforts, roads and walls​
  • The Roman emperor delegated power to the Governor in Britain, who delegated power to local leaders.​
  • Taxes were collected locally and sent to the governor and emperor.​
  • The Romans often allowed native tribe chiefs to continue in their roles as local leaders, as long as they submitted to Roman emperor​
  • The Romans and the Britons had some shared culture, including towns, food and religion.​
  • Literacy – the ability to read and write – allowed Romans to communicate quickly and to write their own versions of history​
  • Drivers of power can be categorised into institutionaleconomicphysicalintellectual and informal
  • The British Empire used similar levers of physical, informal, institutional, economic and intellectual power to keep control of its colonies (case studies of Kenya and India) (Y6)​

Disciplinary

  • Mathematics: Order and compare numbers up to and beyond 1000 (Y3)​
  • Mathematics: Read Roman numerals (Y4)​
  • Causation: Some things that have lots of causes that are connected in some way (Y3 Spr)​
  • Historical evidence: Archaeology is the branch of history that deals with the remains of human life (Y3 Aut)​
  • Historical evidence: There are limits to what historians can learn from any collection of sources (Y3 Aut)​
  • Historical evidence: Sources do not always provide an objective account of what happened in history; historians need to consider the author and purpose and analyse it critically (Y3 Spr)​
  • Chronology: Use vocabulary like decade and century (Y3 Sum)​
  • Chronology: Recognise and use AD/BC and BCE/BC accurately (Y5 Aut)​
  • [Mathematics]: Recognise numbers and years written in Roman numerals​
  • Causation: Causes can be categorised as economic, physical, institutional, social, environmental or others​
  • Causation: Historians can argue that one cause is more important than another​
  • Historical evidence: Historians cross-reference sources in order to build confidence​
  • Chronology: Use vocabulary like decade, century and millennium ​
  • Causation: Historians interpret primary and secondary sources and build arguments to explain the causes of events (Y6)​
  • Chronology: Describe historical periods or events using any date, and millions of years ago (KS3)​

VCs

  • Power, empire & democracy: People get their power in different ways. For example, some are powerful because they have divine status, i.e. seen as half man or half god; some are rich; some have powerful armies (Y3)​
  • Power, empire & democracy: Drivers of power can be categorised into: institutional (i.e. head teacher in charge of a school; priest in charge of a church; king in charge of a country); economic (using money to give you power);  physical (having physical strength or armies);  intellectual (the power of knowledge and literacy); informal (soft power of influencing others).​
  • Power, empire & democracy: Everyone has the power to make change. Protests, campaigns and challenging other people are all ways that we can exert our personal power (Y6)​

 

Summer 1 - WWI (Suffragists/Suffragette movement).

Summer 2

 

 

Required prior knowledge​

Knowledge to be explicitly taught​

How knowledge will be built upon​

Substantive

  • Geography: There are seven continents in the world, six of which people live on (Y1 Sum)​
  • Homo sapiens have lived on Earth for a relatively short time; they shared the Earth with Neanderthals but not with dinosaurs. Prehistoric Britain refers to the study of humans before there was writing (Y3 Aut)​
  • Hunter-gatherer diets gradually gave way to agriculture in the Neolithic period (Y3 Aut)​
  • A lack of written sources mean that it is difficult to know what people believed (Y3 Aut)​
  • The design of hillforts, stone circles and geoglyphs in prehistoric Britain suggest that the natural world was very important (Y3 Aut)​
  • An empire is a group of countries or places ruled by one person (Y3 Spr)​
  • A civilisation is a group of people and their society, culture and way of life (Y3 Sum)​
  • Democracy is a system of government where everyone has a say (Y3 Sum)​
  • The Ancient Greeks borrowed and built on the ideas of other civilisations like those in Ancient Sumer and Ancient Egypt (Y3 Sum)​
  • Geography: Indigenous people are the first people who lived in the place, and the generations of people who came after (Y4 Aut)​
  • Early Roman science borrowed from civilisations around it (Y5 Aut)​
  • Slavery is a system where people are owned by other people. Slaves are forced to work for no money (Y5 Aut)​
  • Science: The Sun is at the centre of the solar system - the heliocentric model (Y5 Sum)​
  • Homo sapiens first lived in Africa ~200,000 BC and migrated across the world over thousands of years​
  • The oral tradition is the sharing of knowledge, beliefs and cultures accumulated over many generations through the spoken word​
  • Ancient civilisations had many similarities with each other (e.g. irrigation, writing, numbers) and made many developments​
  • Civilisations in history often built upon others' ideas​
  • The Scientific Revolution prioritised the scientific method in Europe, and organisations like the Royal Society formalised knowledge​
  • The heliocentric model, first put forward by Aristarchus of Samos and Aryabhata, was published again by Copernicus in 1543. This replaced the mainstream geocentric model
  • Europeans believed that their knowledge was superior to the traditional knowledge of indigenous people, and took over many places across the world​
  • Indigenous peoples fought to resist the Europeans and maintain their traditional knowledge​
  • The British Empire at its peaked covered a quarter of the world’s land. It kept control of its colonies using a range of methods (Y6)​

 

 

Required prior knowledge​

Knowledge to be explicitly taught​

How knowledge will be built upon​

Disciplinary

  • Mathematics/history: Number system over time has developed to include zero (Y4 Aut)​
  • Mathematics: Read, write, order and compare numbers to at least 1 000 000 and determine the value of each digit (Y5)​
  • Historical significance: Historians can set their own criteria for what they consider to be significant, and why it should be studied (Y4 Spr)​
  • Causation: Causes can be categorised as economic, physical, institutional, social, environmental or others (Y5 Spr)​
  • Change & continuity: Changes do not follow one trajectory (Y5 Aut)​
  • Change & continuity: Changes can take place gradually (evolution) or rapidly and completely (revolution) (Y5 Aut)​
  • Similarity & difference: Historians should recognise the similar and different experiences that individuals from the same community have based on their age, gender, race, wealth, sexuality and other characteristics (Y5 Aut)​
  • Historical evidence: There are limits to what historians can learn from any set of sources​
  • Historical evidence: Sources do not always provide an objective account of what happened in history; historians need to consider the author and purpose and analyse it critically​
  • Historical evidence: Political maps have changed over time (Y4 Spr)​
  • Chronology: Use vocabulary like decade, century and millennium (Y5 Spr)​
  • Chronology: Recognise and use AD/BC and BCE/BC accurately (Y5 Aut)​
  • Historical significance: The past is everything that has happened to everyone, but we only learn about some parts in history. The rest is known as silence​
  • Change & continuity: Changes do not always mean progress​
  • Historical significance: What historians consider to be significant is different to different people at different places and times (Y6)​
  • Change & continuity: Consider the nature, pace and extent of change over time, and how interpretations of these changes have also changed! (KS3)​

VCs

  • Quest for knowledge: Knowledge was developed and shared across different civilisations across many continents (Y4)​
  • Quest for knowledge: Different civilisations place different values on knowledge and scientific development than others (Y4)​
  • Quest for knowledge: The oral tradition – still the most dominant form of communication today – is the method of remembering and passing on all of the knowledge accumulated over thousands of generations by the spoken word​
  • Quest for knowledge: Different civilisations take different valid approaches to knowledge. Western science and the emphasis on the scientific method is not the dominant approach everywhere in the world​

Year 6

Autumn 1

Required prior knowledge​

Knowledge to be explicitly taught​

How knowledge will be built upon​

Substantive

  • Prehistoric Britons held spiritual beliefs about the natural world and grave goods suggest that people believed in an afterlife (Y3 Aut)​
  • Roman Emperor Julius Caesar tried to conquer Britain twice from 55 BC but failed; Claudius was successful in AD 43 (Y5 Spr)​
  • Many Christians were persecuted from the 1st century AD until Emperor Constantine declared tolerance for all beliefs (Y5 Aut)​
  • Geography: Human features are man-made, physical features are those that would be there without humans (Y1 Aut)​
  • Geography: Trade is the process of buying and selling goods (Y5 Aut)​
  • Geography: Imports are goods that are brought into the country. Exports are goods that are traded out of the country (Y5 Aut)​
  • Drivers of power can be categorised into institutional, economic, physical, intellectual and informal (Y5 Spr)​
  • The Anglo-Saxons were groups of Germanic invaders who established kingdoms in England after the Romans left​
  • The Anglo-Saxons established seven kingdoms which eventually became five, then three. By ~AD 1000 England was united for the first time under one Anglo-Saxon king​
  • The term 'Anglo-Saxon' now refers more generally to the period of English history from AD 410 to 1066, and includes the history of everyone in England​
  • Sutton Hoo was the burial site of an Anglo-Saxon king, discovered by archeologists in 1939​
  • Archaeological evidence reveals that the transition from Anglo-Saxon beliefs to Christianity was slow and complicated for individuals​
  • Archaeological evidence reveals that the Anglo-Saxons were skilled craftsmen who traded with countries as far east as India and Sri Lanka​
  • The items the king was buried with show he wanted to present himself as having physicaleconomicintellectual and informal power​
  • The Vikings were groups of people from Scandinavia who were most powerful in the 9th and 10th centuries. The Vikings invaded and settled in Anglo-Saxon lands and established, for a time, Danelaw alongside Anglo-Saxon kingdoms​

Disciplinary

  • Historical evidence: Primary sources are sources that were created by someone who experienced the event firsthand. Secondary sources are about primary sources (Y2 Aut)​
  • Historical evidence: Archaeology is the branch of history that deals with the remains of human life. Archaeologists study artefacts, ecofacts and features  (Y3 Aut)​
  • Historical evidence: There are limits to what historians can learn from any collection of sources (Y3 Aut)​
  • Historical evidence: Historians cross-reference sources in order to build confidence (Y5 Spr)​
  • Chronology: Describe historical periods and times using dates and as a given number of years ago (Y4 Spr)​
  • Chronology: Recognise and use AD/BC and BCE/BC accurately (Y5 Aut)​
  • Science: There are four main stages of enquiry (A&P, M&O, R&P, A&E)​
  • Historical evidence: Archaeologists follow a similar process to scientists: Planning; Measuring & Observing; Recording & Presenting; Analysing & Evaluating​
  • Historical evidence: Evaluate the usefulness of sources, recognising bias and intentions, and understanding their limitations (KS3)​
  • Historical evidence: Analysing a wide range of sources in increasingly creative ways (KS3)​

VCs

  • Quest for knowledge: The oral tradition – still the most dominant form of communication today – is the method of remembering and passing on all of the knowledge accumulated over thousands of generations by the spoken word (Y5)​

 

Autumn 2

Required prior knowledge​

Knowledge to be explicitly taught​

How knowledge will be built upon​

Substantive

  • Geography: The seas that surround the UK are the North Sea, the Irish Sea and the English Channel (Y2 Sum)​
  • Grave goods suggest that people believed in an afterlife (Y3 Aut)​
  • Democracy is a system of government where everyone has a say (Y3 Sum)​
  • The Ancient Egyptians (Y3 Spr), the Ancient Greeks (Y3 Sum), Ancient Maya (Y4 Aut) and the Romans (Y5 Aut) believed in multiple gods​
  • The Romans (Y5 Aut) and the Anglo-Saxons (Y6 Aut) gradually converted to Christianity​
  • Slavery is a system where people are owned by other people. Slaves are forced to work for no money (Y5 Aut)​
  • Geography: Trade is the process of buying and selling goods (Y5 Aut)​
  • Geography: Trade has become increasingly global (Y5 Aut)​
  • The Anglo-Saxons established seven kingdoms which eventually became five, then three. By ~AD 1000 England was united for the first time under one Anglo-Saxon king (Y6 Aut)​
  • Geography: Migration is the process of moving from one place to another. It does not have to be between countries, but where it is it is called immigration (in) or emigration (out) (Y6 Spr)​
  • Geography: People migrate because of push and pull factors  (Y6 Spr)​
  • Geography: Voluntary migration usually happens because of economic or social factors (Y6 Spr).​
  • The Vikings were groups of people from Scandinavia who were most active in 9th and 10th centuries​
  • In Scandinavia, Vikings lived in longhouses, in communities of farmers and craftsmen​
  • The Vikings were successful sailors and sailed in longships as far as North America.​
  • The Vikings organised themselves in ways that had autocratic and democratic features (such as things)​
  • The Vikings believed in multiple gods, like Odin, Thor and Loki​
  • The Vikings believed in an afterlife called Valhalla, which had an end​
  • The Vikings gradually converted to Christianity​
  • The Vikings made and traded goods across Europe and beyond​
  • The Vikings participated in a slave trade
  • The Vikings first raided monasteries England in 793 because they were rich and easy targets​
  • The Vikings began to settle in the 850s and tried to conquer England in 865. Danelaw was established in 878 and lasted until 974​
  • England had three Viking kings 1013-1042​
  • Vikings occupy a significant place in our popular culture, and there have been many different representations of them over the years​
  • The Vikings could be presented as violent warriors or noble explorers, depending on who was writing and when​
  • The transatlantic slave trade was one of the big building blocks of the British Empire (Y6 Sum)​
  • Harold Hardraada was the last Viking to invade England. He was defeated by Harold Godwinson at the battle of Stamford Bridge, just before Harold Godwinson was himself defeated by William the Conqueror at the battle of Hastings in 1066 (KS3)​

Disciplinary

  • Causation: Historians can argue that one cause is more important than another (Y5 Spr)​
  • Historical evidence: Sources do not always provide an objective account of what happened in history; historians need to consider the author and purpose and analyse it critically (Y3 Spr)​
  • Historical evidence: Historians cross-reference sources in order to build confidence (Y5 Spr)​
  • Similarity & difference: Historians should recognise the similar and different experiences that individuals from the same community have based on their age, gender, race, wealth, sexuality and other characteristics (Y5 Aut)​
  • Causation: Historians interpret primary and secondary sources and build arguments to explain the causes of events​
  • Causation: Understanding the historiography of causation; historians’ arguments are always informed by the time and place in which they live(d) (KS3)​

VCs

  • Community & family: Systems of slavery have existed in communities and civilisations across the world for a long time. Slaves could be taken from different communities based on their wealth (Y5)​
  • Community & family: Slaves could be taken from different communities based on their race, ethnicity or gender​
  • Community & family: Issues of modern slavery that remain in the world today (KS3)​

 

Spring – WWII

Summer

Required prior knowledge​

Knowledge to be explicitly taught​

How knowledge will be built upon​

Substantive

  • Geography: There are seven continents in the world, six of which people live on (Y1 Sum)​
  • An empire is a group of countries or places ruled by one person (Y3 Spr)​
  • Geography: Indigenous (native) people are the first people who lived in the place, and the generations of people who came after (Y4 Aut)​
  • Slavery is a system where people are owned by other people. Slaves are forced to work for no money (Y5 Aut)​
  • Drivers of power can be categorised into institutional, economic, physical, intellectual and informal (Y5 Spr)​
  • Geography: Migration is the process of moving from one place to another. It does not have to be between countries, but where it is it is called immigration (in) or emigration (out). People migrate because of push and pull factor (Y6 Spr)​
  • The British Empire grew from the sixteenth century and, at its peak in 1919, covered a quarter of the world's land​
  • The British Empire forcefully colonised places around the world and substantially changed the lives of many of the people it colonised
  • The British maintained control of its colonies with physicaleconomicinstitutionalintellectual and informal power (case studies of India and South Africa)​
  • The British Empire declined after the world wars, and countries such as India and Kenya gained independence after prolonged independence movements​
  • The Windrush generation are people who arrived in the UK from Commonwealth countries 1948-71.​
  • Many people of the Windrush generation faced racial discrimination
  • The British civil rights movement in Britain gained momentum in the 1960s with the Notting Hill Race Riots, the Bristol Bus Boycott and Trial of the Mangrove Nine
  • The Race Relations Act of 1965, 1968, 1976 made racial discrimination illegal​
  • Racial equality laws have not solved all of Britain's problems, and discrimination and racism is still prevalent in some forms today​
  • Pupils will build on their knowledge of the British Empire, and explore how it gained and maintained power in different colonies across the world (KS3)​

Disciplinary

  • Historical significance: The past is everything that has happened to everyone, but we only learn about some parts in history. The rest is known as silence (Y5 Sum)​
  • Similarity & difference: Historians should recognise the similar and different experiences that individuals from the same community have based on their age, gender, race, wealth, sexuality and other characteristics (Y5 Aut)​
  • Historical evidence: Primary sources are sources that were created by someone who experienced the event firsthand. Secondary sources are about primary sources (Y2 Aut)​
  • Chronology: Convert between a year and a century (Y4)​
  • Historical significance: What historians consider to be significant is different to different people at different places and times​
  • Historical significance: We, as historians, can recognise reasons for why we are studying something in a particular place or time​
  • Historical significance is not fixed or ascribed, but is a social and cultural process that historians need to be mindful of (KS3)​

VCs

  • Power, empire & democracy: Drivers of power can be categorised into institutional, economic, physical, intellectual, and informal (Y5)​
  • Quest for knowledge: Different civilisations take different valid approaches to knowledge. Western science and the emphasis on the scientific method is not the dominant approach everywhere in the world (Y5)​
  • Power, empire & democracy: Everyone has the power to make change. Protests, campaigns and challenging other people are all ways that we can exert our personal power​
  • Quest for knowledge: Deciding what knowledge is taught in schools is a contentious decision, and people have different opinions about it​
  • Power, empire & democracy: Understanding how power is legitimised and wielded in different contexts and how this changes over time (KS3)​
  • Quest for knowledge: Recognising and debating issues around ‘decolonising’ the curriculum and western institutions​