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R.E.

R.E.

Religious Education Vision

Religious Education should engage, inspire, and challenge pupils, equipping them with the knowledge and skills to explore difficult philosophical questions, develop an understanding of different religious beliefs and also encourage them to reflect on their own ideas and way of living. RE helps children to combat prejudice, appreciate diversity and promotes the integral values of tolerance and respect. In this way, the RE curriculum contributes towards establishing British values and aids children’s spiritual, moral, social, and cultural development. RE has an important role in preparing pupils for adult life, employment, and lifelong learning.

Our RE curriculum enables pupils to develop a rich knowledge and deep understanding of the Christian faith. They will also learn about Islam, Judaism, Hinduism, Sikhism and Buddhism. Through high quality RE teaching, children will develop a wide range of skills including enquiry, interpretation, evaluation, and reflection. Pupils are encouraged to participate in philosophical discussions and explore their own ideas and beliefs in a classroom environment where they feel heard, respected, and understood.

Curriculum Aims

  • Pupils develop open, sensitive, reflective, and critical approaches to understanding humankind’s varied religions and beliefs, exploring practices, values, beliefs and lifestyles, relating these to their own experiences and to questions in everyday life.
  • Acquire and develop knowledge and understanding of Christianity and the other principal religions and beliefs represented in the UK and globally.
  • Develop an understanding of the influence of beliefs, values and traditions on individuals, communities, societies, and cultures.
  • Develop positive attitudes of respect towards other people who hold views and beliefs different from their own, and towards living in a society of diverse religions and beliefs.
  • Develop the ability to make reasoned and informed judgements about religious and moral issues with reference to the teachings of the principal religions and beliefs represented in the UK.
  • Enhance their spiritual, moral, social and cultural education by developing awareness of fundamental questions of life, responding to such questions with reference to religions and beliefs and reflecting on their own beliefs values and experiences.

R.E Overview

R.E Overview 2022-2023

Year

Autumn

Believing

Religious beliefs, teachings, sources; questions about meaning, purpose and truth

 

Spring

Expressing

Religious and spiritual forms of expression; questions about identity and diversity

 

Summer

Living

Religious practices and ways of living; questions about values and commitments

Reception

F1 Which stories are special and why? F2 Which people are special and why?

F3 Which places are special and why?

 F4 Which times are special and why?

F5 Where do we belong?

F6 What is special about our world and why?

Year 1

Who is a Christian and what do they believe?

1.5 What makes some places sacred? Christians, Muslims and/or Jewish people

1.7 What does it mean to belong to a faith community? Christians, Muslims and Jewish people

Year 2

1.2 Who is a Muslim and what do they believe?

Y2 1.3 Who is Jewish and what do they believe?

 Y2 1.4 What can we learn from sacred books?

1.6 How and why do we celebrate special and sacred times? Christians, Jewish people and/or Muslims

1.8 How should we care for others and the world, and why does it matter? Christians, Muslims and/or Jewish people

Year 3

L2.1 What do different people believe about God? Christians, Hindus and/or Muslims

L2.2 Why is the Bible so important for Christians today?

L2.4 Why do people pray? Christians, Hindus and/or Muslims (Y3)

L2.5 Why are festivals important to religious communities? Christians, Hindus and/or Muslims and/or Jewish people (Y3 & Y4)

2.7 What does it mean to be a Christian in Britain today?

Year 4

L2.3 Why is Jesus inspiring to some people?

L2.5 Why are festivals important to religious communities? Christians, Hindus and/or Muslims and/or Jewish people (Y3 & Y4)

L2.6 Why do some people think that life is like a journey and what significant experiences mark this? Christians, Hindus and/or Jewish people and nonreligious responses (e.g. Humanist)

L2.8 What does it mean to be a Hindu in Britain today?

Year 5

U2.1 Why do some people think God exists? Christians and non-religious (e.g. Humanists)

U2.4 If God is everywhere, why go to a place of worship? Christians, Hindus and/or Jewish people

L2.8 What does it mean to be a Muslim in Britain today? (Y5)

Year 6

U2.2 What would Jesus do? (Can we live by the values of Jesus in the twenty-first century?) (Y5) U2.3 What do religions say to us when life gets hard? Christians, Hindus and non-religious (e.g. Humanists) (Y6)

U2.5 Is it better to express your beliefs in arts and architecture or in charity and generosity? Christians, Muslims and non-religious (e.g. Humanists) (Y6)

U2.7 What matters most to Christians and Humanists?

U2.8 What difference does it make to believe in ahimsa (harmlessness), grace and/or Ummah (community)? Christians, Hindus and/or Muslims

  R.E Progression Map

 

EYFS

Key Question F1: Which stories are special and why?

The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own.

 

One way of introducing this question is to ask children to bring favourite books and stories from home, choose the favourite story in the class, or the teacher could share her favourite childhood story and explain why she liked it so much.

Questions you might explore:

These are suggested questions; you will not necessarily explore all of these questions.

Learning outcomes:

Teachers should select from the following outcomes, and set up learning experiences that enable pupils to …

Suggested content:

Teachers can select content from this column to help pupils achieve some of the learning outcomes in column 2. Teachers can use different content as appropriate.

What is your favourite story?

What do you like about it, and why?

What stories do you know about Jesus?

What do you think Jesus was (is) like?

Do you know any Bible stories?

What stories do you know that are special to Christians (or other faiths)?

Who are the stories about?

What happens in the story?

Does the story tell you about God? What do you learn?

What stories do you know that tell you how you should behave towards other people?

What are the similarities and differences between different people’s special stories?

• talk about some religious stories

• recognise some religious words, e.g. about God • identify some of their own feelings in the stories they hear

• identify a sacred text e.g. Bible, Qur’an

• talk about what Jesus teaches about keeping promises and say why keeping promises is a good thing to do

• talk about what Jesus teaches about saying ‘thank you’, and why it is good to thank and be thanked.

 

• Explore stories pupils like, re-telling stories to others and sharing features of the story they like. • Talk about the Bible being the Christians’ holy book which helps them to understand more about God, and how people and the world work. Look at a range of children’s Bibles to see how they are similar/different. Share a Bible story from a suitable children’s Bible, e.g. ‘Butterworth and Inkpen’ series; Scripture Union The Big Bible Storybook.

• Hear and explore stories from the Bible, stories Jesus told, stories from the life of Jesus (e.g David the Shepherd Boy (1 Samuel 17); the story of Ruth (book of Ruth in the Bible); Jesus as friend to the friendless (Zacchaeus, Luke 19); making promises (Matthew 21:28– 32); saying ‘thank you’ (Ten Lepers Luke 17:11–19).

• Hear a selection of stories taken from major faith traditions and cultures, including stories about leaders or founders within faiths, e.g. Prophet Muhammad and the night of power.

• Explore stories through play, role play, freeze-framing, model-making, puppets and shadow puppets, art, dance, music etc. Reinforce this learning through follow-up activities:

• Use the story sack for Diwali celebration role play.

• Read and share the books in own time, on own or with friends.

• Role-play some of the stories using costumes and props.

 

Key Question F2: Which people are special and why?

The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own.

 

One way of introducing this question is to talk about significant people within the school and the wider community, for example showing pictures of the caretaker, lollypop person, headteacher, vicar, police community support officer, and discussing what they do

Questions you might explore:

These are suggested questions; you will not necessarily explore all of these questions

Learning outcomes:

 Teachers should select from the following outcomes, and set up learning experiences that enable pupils to

Suggested content:

Teachers can select content from this column to help pupils achieve some of the learning outcomes in column 2. Teachers can use different content as appropriate.

Who is special to you and why?

What is a good friend like?

How can you show that you are a good friend? What stories did Jesus tell about being a friend and caring for others?

What stories do special people tell in other religions?

talk about people who are special to them

• say what makes their family and friends special to them

• identify some of the qualities of a good friend

 • reflect on the question ‘Am I a good friend?’

• recall and talk about stories of Jesus as a friend to others

• recall stories about special people in other religions and talk about what we can learn from them.

• Talk about people who are special to us, whom we admire. • Meet a special person that helps them, e.g. crossing guide. ‘Hot seat’ the invited guest. Question the guest about likes and dislikes of their job. Ask how they cope with the difficult aspects.

• Meet a person with a religious faith, e.g. vicar or a parent. ‘Hot seat’ the invited guest. Ask why he/she believes and what is important in his/her life.

• Discuss the benefits and responsibilities of friendship and the ways that people care for others.

 • Tell stories from the Bible about friendship and care for others, with a focus on what Jesus did and said, e.g. Zacchaeus (Luke 19); Jesus choosing the twelve disciples (his special friends and helpers) (Matthew 4.17–22); stories of Jesus helping and healing people e.g. Jairus’ daughter (Mark 5.21–43); healing the man at the pool (John 5.5–9); Blind Bartimaeus (Mark 11.46–52).

 • Discuss stories of a key religious leader from another religion and how these are important to people today (e.g. Guru Nanak, Prophet Muhammad, the Buddha). Reinforce this learning through follow-up activities:

• Role-play the special visitors using appropriate dressing-up clothes.

• Draw and paint pictures about the visitors.

• Make thank-you cards for the visitors.

• Use digital cameras to take pictures of the visitors during the visit and make a book using the photographs.

 

Key question F3: Which places are special and why?

The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own.

 

 One way of introducing this question is to discuss places that are important to children, for example places to be happy, to have fun, to be quiet or to feel safe. When do they go to these places and what is it like being there?

Questions you might explore:

 These are suggested questions; you will not necessarily explore all of these question

Learning outcomes:

Teachers should select from the following outcomes, and set up learning experiences that enable pupils to …

Suggested content:

Teachers can select content from this column to help pupils achieve some of the learning outcomes in column 2. Teachers can use different content as appropriate.

Where do you feel safe? Why?

Where do you feel happy? Why?

Where is special to me?

Where is a special place for believers to go?

What makes this place special?

talk about somewhere that is special to themselves, saying why

• be aware that some religious people have places which have special meaning for them

• talk about the things that are special and valued in a place of worship

• identify some significant features of sacred places

• recognise a place of worship

• get to know and use appropriate words to talk about their thoughts and feelings when visiting a church.

• Invite visitors to talk about/show pictures of places that are spiritually significant to them and say why they are special. (e.g. this might be visiting an art gallery and looking at a wonderful picture and how this makes them feel; the memories this brings back or encouragement for the future. Alternatively this could be the local park where they meet together and play. This should build learning towards understanding special places for religious people). Children share and record their own special places in a variety of ways, drawing on all their senses, in a way that is meaningful to them.

• Discuss why some places are special and what makes them significant.

• Discuss when people like to go there and what they like to do there.

• Consider the church building as a special place for Christians and/or a mosque as a special place for Muslims.

• Consider a place of worship for members of another faith e.g. synagogue or mosque. • Consider different special places, such as (Makkah) Mecca for Muslims.

• Visit a local place of worship. • Create a special place in the inside/outside area or wider school grounds. A space for quiet reflection. This will work well for schools who have a forest schools focus

 

Key question F4: Which times are special and why?

The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own.

 

 One way of introducing this question is to link this unit to a significant time celebrated in school or in class. You might want to bring in birthday candles and ask children to talk about the significance of birthdays.

Questions you might explore:

 These are suggested questions; you will not necessarily explore all of these question

Learning outcomes:

Teachers should select from the following outcomes, and set up learning experiences that enable pupils to …

Suggested content:

Teachers can select content from this column to help pupils achieve some of the learning outcomes in column 2. Teachers can use different content as appropriate.

What special times have you had?

What did you celebrate? Why?

Who were you with? What happened? What do other people celebrate?

What happens at Christmas, and why? What happens at Easter, and why? What stories do you know about Jesus’ birth and when he died?

What do you think about Jesus?

What do Christians say about Jesus? What other festivals have you learnt about?

What happens at the festivals, and why?

What stories can you remember about festivals?

What are the similarities and differences between different people’s special times?

• give examples of special occasions and suggest features of a good celebration

• recall simple stories connected with Christmas/ Easter and a festival from another faith

• say why Christmas/Easter and a festival from another faith is a special time for Christians/ members of the other faith.

 

• Discuss the importance and value of celebration in children’s own lives

• Look at reminders (cards, invitations, photos, wrapping paper) of special days, e.g. birthday, wedding, christening, Christmas, mother’s day

• Consider some major religious festivals and celebrations, e.g. seasonal festivals including Christmas and Easter, and the stories associated with them; Sukkoth; Eid-ul-Adha; Diwali;

• Use a variety of media to explore ways of celebrating, and how religious believers celebrate festivals and special times. NB Whilst most families will celebrate birthdays not all cultures do, so sensitivity is needed here and teachers’ deep knowledge of children’s cultural backgrounds makes a big difference

 

Key Question F5: Where do we belong?

The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own.

 

One way of introducing this question is to ask a new mum to bring a baby into the class and talk about how the baby was welcomed into their family

Questions you might explore:

 These are suggested questions; you will not necessarily explore all of these question

Learning outcomes:

Teachers should select from the following outcomes, and set up learning experiences that enable pupils to …

Suggested content:

Teachers can select content from this column to help pupils achieve some of the learning outcomes in column 2. Teachers can use different content as appropriate.

How do we show respect for one another?

How do we show love/how do I know I am loved? Who do you care about? How do we show care/how do I know I am cared for?

How do you know what people are feeling?

How do we show people they are welcome? What things can we do better together rather than on our own?

Where do you belong?

How do you know you belong?

What makes us feel special about being welcomed into a group of people?

• re-tell religious stories making connections with personal experiences • share and record occasions when things have happened in their lives that made them feel special

• recall simply what happens at a traditional Christian infant baptism and dedication

• additional opportunity if you have children from religions other than Christianity in your setting

• recall simply what happens when a baby is welcomed into a religion other than Christianity.

• Discuss the idea that each person is unique and valuable.

• Discuss religious beliefs that each person is unique and valuable.

• Consider religious beliefs about God loving each person, e.g. Jewish and Christian ideas that God loves people even from before they are born (Psalm 139), and they are written on the palm of his hand (Isaiah 49 v.16). Children could draw around their hands, write their names on the palm and decorate; Christian beliefs about Jesus believing children to be very special. Tell story of children wanting to see Jesus and disciples stopping them (Mark 10 v.13–16).

• Discuss how God’s love for children is shown in Christianity through infant baptism and dedication.

• Discuss how children are welcomed into another faith or belief community e.g. Islam Aqiqah ceremony, whispering of adhan and cutting of hair, Humanist – naming ceremony.

• Consider signs and symbols used in the welcoming of children into the faith community e.g. baptismal candle.

• Consider ways of showing that people are special from other religions e.g. Hinduism: Stories about Hindus celebrating Raksha Bandhan – which celebrates the special bond between brothers and sisters. His sister ties a band (rakhi) of gold or red threads around the right hand of a brother

 

Key Question F6: What is special about our world?

The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own.

 

One way of introducing this question is to study this at the same time as work on the school outside space or local area or work on growing things

 

Questions you might explore:

These are suggested questions; you will not necessarily explore all of these question

Learning outcomes:

Teachers should select from the following outcomes, and set up learning experiences that enable pupils to …

Suggested content:

Teachers can select content from this column to help pupils achieve some of the learning outcomes in column 2. Teachers can use different content as appropriate.

What do you like in nature?

 What is your favourite thing? Why do you like it best of all?

What have you learned about nature that is new to you?

Why do some people say the world is special?

What do you think is special about the world?

What stories of creation do Christians tell?

 What do people say about how we should look after the world?

How do you think we should look after the world?

What are the similarities and differences between different people’s ideas about the world?

• talk about things they find interesting, puzzling or wonderful and also about their own experiences and feelings about the world

• re-tell stories, talking about what they say about the world, God, human beings

• think about the wonders of the natural world, expressing ideas and feelings

• express ideas about how to look after animals and plants

• talk about what people do to mess up the world and what they do to look after it

• Experience and explore the wonders and beauty of the natural world and life cycles of new life, growth and decay; explore the idea that the world is special and that some people believe it was created by God.

• Use art and creative activities to explore natural objects – shapes, pattern, or use micro-hike or listening walk; grow and look after some plants and creatures.

• Use stories and poems to talk about creation (e.g. ‘God’s quiet things’ by Nancy Sweetland); explore stories with stilling exercises, acting out stories etc; link with ideas of how special children are (marvel at moving toes, wiggling fingers, listening ears, clever thoughts).

• Use a simple child-friendly, but authentic version of the biblical creation story, e.g ‘In the beginning’ by Steve Turner; explore in mime, express through art; reflect on ways in which the world is ‘very good’.

• Hear/role-play stories from faiths about care for animals and the world. E.g. From Islam: ‘Muhammad and the ant’ (talk about caring for animals, looking after pets); ‘Muhammad and the thirsty camel’ (talk about how the camel felt; whether they have ever done something they are sorry for).

• ‘Seven new kittens’/ ‘The tiny ant’ (Muslim stories retold by Gill Vaisey www.booksatpress.co.uk www.articlesoffaith.co.uk)

 

KS1

Key Question: .1.1 Who is a Christian and what do they believe?

The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own

Strand / Questions/ Religions

Learning outcomes

 (intended to enable pupils to achieve end of key stage outcomes)

Suggested content for learning:

Teachers can select content from these examples, and add more of their own

Strand: Believing Recommended Y1 Questions in this thread: 1.2

Who is a Muslim and what do they believe?

 1.3 Who is Jewish and what do they believe?

L2.1 What do different people believe about God?

U2.1 Why do some people believe God exists?

 3.1 Do we need to prove God’s existence?

Religions and worldviews: Christians

Teachers will enable pupils to be able to achieve some of these outcomes, as appropriate to their age and stage: Emerging:

• Talk about the fact that Christians believe in God and follow the example of Jesus (A1).

• Recognise some Christian symbols and images used to express ideas about God (A3). Expected:

• Talk about some simple ideas about Christian beliefs about God and Jesus (A1).

• Re-tell a story that shows what Christians might think about God, in words, drama and pictures, suggesting what it means (A2).

• Talk about issues of good and bad, right and wrong arising from the stories (C3).

• Ask some questions about believing in God and offer some ideas of their own (C1). Exceeding:

• Make links between what Jesus taught and what Christians believe and do (A2). • Respond thoughtfully to a piece of Christian music and a Bible text that inspired it (B1).

• Share stories that help to show how Christians think of God e.g. the book of Jonah in the Old Testament, the Annunciation (Luke1:26–56), the lost son (Luke 15:11–32) and Pentecost (Acts 2:1–13).

• Describe some of the beliefs that Christians hold about God e.g. all-powerful, loving, close to every person, forgiving.

• Look at art and recognise some symbols and images used to express ideas about God.

• Listen to pieces of music that express ideas about God.

• Talk to Christians about what they believe about God.

• Give opportunities for children to reflect on and express their own big questions about life and God, in particular through discussion, art, music and drama e.g responding to the question ‘Where is God?’ through art.

• Using a suitable children’s Bible (e.g. The Lion Storyteller Bible or New International Children’s Version), share stories that show the importance of Jesus to Christians e.g. a parable, a miracle, a teaching of Jesus, birth and death and resurrection of Jesus.

• Linking with these stories, describe some of the beliefs that Christians hold about Jesus e.g. that he was kind to people in need, that he performed miracles, that he is the son of God, that he lives.

• Investigate how Christians follow teaching from the Bible about how to live their lives e.g. prayer and worship, treating others kindly. Hear and think about some prayers Christians use.

• Experience thanking and being thanked, praising and being praised, and connect this experience simply to an idea about worship.

• Explore what the idea of God means for the children themselves

 

Key Question: : 1.2 Who is a Muslim and what do they believe?

The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own

Strand / Questions/ Religions

Learning outcomes

 (intended to enable pupils to achieve end of key stage outcomes)

Suggested content for learning:

Teachers can select content from these examples, and add more of their own

Strand: Believing Recommended Y2 Questions in this thread:

1.1 Who is a Christian and what do they believe?

 1.3 Who is Jewish and what do they believe?

 L2.1 What do different people believe about God?

 U2.1 Why do some people believe God exists?

 3.1 Do we need to prove God’s existence? Religions and worldviews: Muslims

Teachers will enable pupils to be able to achieve some of these outcomes, as appropriate to their age and stage: Emerging:

• Talk about the fact that Muslims believe in God (Allah) and follow the example of the Prophet Muhammad identify some ways Muslims mark Ramadan and celebrate Eid-ul-Fitr (A1). • Recognise that Muslims do not draw Allah or the Prophet, but use calligraphy to say what God is like (A3). Expected:

• Talk about some simple ideas about Muslim beliefs about God, making links with some of the 99 Names of Allah (A1). • Re-tell a story about the life of the Prophet Muhammad (A2).

 • Recognise some objects used by Muslims and suggest why they are important (A2).

 • Identify some ways Muslims mark Ramadan and celebrate Eid-ul-Fitr and how this might make them feel (B1). Exceeding:

• Make links between what the Holy Qur’an says and how Muslims behave (A2).

• Ask some questions about God that are hard to answer and offer some ideas of their own (C1)

• Share stories that help to show how Muslims think of God (Allah) and how following God shows them ways to behave e.g. ‘Muhammad and the cat’, ‘The story of the two brothers’, ‘The crying camel’.

 • Look at calligraphy and listen to nasheeds that express ideas about God and the Prophet Muhammad e.g. calligraphy showing some of the 99 names of Allah; I am a Muslim by Zain Bhikha; share the words of the Shahadah, listen to the Call to Prayer.

• Give children a way to respond to their own big questions e.g writing a class big questions poem or a ‘Where is God?’ poem.

• Describe one of the beliefs that Muslims hold about God e.g. tawhid.

• Share the story of the revelation of the Holy Qur’an – how the Angel Jibril revealed it to Prophet Muhammad on Mount Hira; how Muslims learn Arabic to be able to read and remember it; some teachings from the Holy Qur’an.

• Talk to Muslims about what they believe about God.

• Explore what the concept of God means for the children themselves.

• Identify the objects that are most precious to them. Why are they precious? How does it show?

• Identify objects that are significant to Muslims; if possible, see them being used by a believer, e.g. prayer beads, prayer mat, Qur’an and stand, compass, headscarf. Why are these important?

• Share the experiences of a Muslim during the fast of Ramadan and the celebrating of Eid-ul-Fitr. Why do Muslims celebrate?

 

Key Question: 1.3 Who is Jewish and what do they believe?

The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own.

Strand / Questions/ Religions

Learning outcomes

 (intended to enable pupils to achieve end of key stage outcomes)

Suggested content for learning:

Teachers can select content from these examples, and add more of their own

Strand: Believing Recommended Y2 Questions in this thread:

1.1 Who is a Christian and what do they believe?

1.2 Who is a Muslim and what do they believe?

 L2.1 What do different people believe about God?

 U2.1 Why do some people believe God exists?

3.1 Do we need to prove God’s existence? Religions and worldviews: Jewish people

Teachers will enable pupils to be able to achieve some of these outcomes, as appropriate to their age and stage: Emerging:

• Talk about the fact that Jewish people believe in God (A1).

• Recognise that some Jewish people remember God in different ways (e.g. mezuzah, on Shabbat) (A3). Expected:

• Talk about how the mezuzah in the home reminds Jewish people about God (A3).

• Talk about how Shabbat is a special day of the week for Jewish people, and give some examples of what they might do to celebrate Shabbat (B1).

 • Re-tell a story that shows what Jewish people at the festivals of Sukkot, Chanukah or Pesach might think about God, suggesting what it means (A2).

• Ask some questions about believing in God and offer some ideas of their own (C1). Exceeding:

• Make links between some Jewish teachings and how Jewish people live (A2).

 • Express their own ideas about the value of times of reflection, thanksgiving, praise and remembrance, in the light of their learning about why Jewish people choose to celebrate in these ways (C1)

• Discuss what precious items they have in their home. Why are they important?

• Experience celebrating in the classroom, with music, food or fun, and talk about how special times can make people happy and thoughtful.

• Talk about remembering what really matters: how do people make a special time to remember?

• Introduce Jewish beliefs about God (some Jewish people write G-d, because they do not want the name of God to be erased or defaced) – as expressed in the Shema i.e. God is one, creator and cares for all people.

• Look at a Mezuzah, how it is used and how it has the words of the Shema inside. Why do Jews have this in their home? What words would they like to have displayed in their home?

 • Find out what Jewish people do in the home on Shabbat, including preparation for Shabbat, candles, blessing the children, wine, challah bread, family meal, rest. Explore how some Jewish people call it the ‘day of delight’, and celebrate God’s creation (God rested on the seventh day). What is really good about having times of rest when life is busy? When do pupils have times of rest and for family in their home?

• Consider the importance and value of celebration and remembrance in children’s own lives; learn about the festival of Sukkoth, Chanukah or Pesach (Passover), the stories and meanings associated with them; find out about the menorah (7 branched candlestick) and how the 9-branched Chanukiah links to the story of Chanukah.

 • Use play, artefacts, photographs and storytelling to explore questions about Jewish life for themselves.

 

Key Question: 1.4 What can we learn from sacred books?

The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own.

Strand / Questions/ Religions

Learning outcomes

 (intended to enable pupils to achieve end of key stage outcomes)

Suggested content for learning:

Teachers can select content from these examples, and add more of their own

Strand: Believing Recommended Y2 Questions in this thread:

 F1: Which stories are special and why? L2.2 Why is the Bible so important for Christians today?

3.2 Does living biblically mean obeying the whole Bible?

Religions and worldviews: Christians, Muslims, Jewish people

Teachers will enable pupils to be able to achieve some of these outcomes, as appropriate to their age and stage: Emerging:

• Talk about some of the stories that are used in religion and why people still read them (A2).

• Recognise some ways in which Christians, Muslims and Jewish people treat their sacred books (B3). Expected: • Recognise that sacred texts contain stories which are special to many people and should be treated with respect (B3).

• Re-tell stories from the Christian Bible and stories from another faith; suggest the meaning of these stories (A2).

• Ask and suggest answers to questions arising from stories Jesus told and from another religion (C1).

• Talk about issues of good and bad, right and wrong arising from the stories (C3). Exceeding:

• Suggest their own ideas about stories from sacred texts and give reasons for their significance (C1).

• Make links between the messages within sacred texts and the way people live (A2)

• Explore what a story is and why we like them; are there different types of story? Introduce a parable as a story with a deeper meaning. Talk about how some books are more than special – they are sacred or holy, meaning that people believe that they are from God.

• Introduce the Bible as a sacred text for Christians.

• Introduce a sacred text for Muslims – Holy Qur’an, and/or Jewish people – Tenakh.

• Investigate how these books are used and treated – Torah (part of Tenakh): often read from scrolls in the synagogue, beautifully written in Hebrew; Bible translated into lots of different versions to make accessible to all; Holy Qur’an kept in its original Arabic, as Muslims believe that is how it was revealed to Prophet Muhammad.

 • Read, act out and illustrate some stories Jesus told about what God is like (e.g. ‘The lost sheep/Lost coin’ Luke 15) and how to treat each other (e.g. ‘The good Samaritan’ Luke 10).

• Explore stories from Jewish sacred text, the Tenakh, which teach about God looking after his people e.g. ‘Joseph and his brothers’ (Genesis 37, 39–48); the story of Moses (book of Exodus); ‘The call of Samuel’ (1 Samuel 3); ‘David and Goliath’ (1 Samuel 17); Jonah (Book of Jonah).

 • Explore stories about Prophet Muhammad (e.g. ‘Muhammad and the hungry stranger’, ‘The thirsty camel’, ‘The sleeping cat’, ‘Muhammad and Bilal’, ‘Muhammad and the rebuilding of the Ka’aba’).

• Share an example of a story that occurs in more than one sacred text e.g. the story of Noah, which is sacred to Muslims, Jews and Christians.

 

Key Question: 1.5 What makes some places sacred?

The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own.

Strand / Questions/ Religions

Learning outcomes

 (intended to enable pupils to achieve end of key stage outcomes)

Suggested content for learning:

Teachers can select content from these examples, and add more of their own

Strand: Expressing Recommended Y1 Questions in this thread:

 F3 Which places are special and why?

 L2.4 Why do people pray?

U2.4 If God is everywhere, why go to a place of worship?

3.6 Should religious buildings be sold to feed the starving?

 Religions and worldviews: Christians, Muslims and/or Jewish people

Teachers will enable pupils to be able to achieve some of these outcomes, as appropriate to their age and stage: Emerging:

 • Recognise that there are special places where people go to worship, and talk about what people do there (A1).

• Identify at least three objects used in worship in two religions (A3). Expected:

• Identify special objects and symbols found in a place where people worship and be able to say something about what they mean and how they are used (A3).

 • Talk about ways in which stories, objects, symbols and actions used in churches, mosques and/or synagogues show what people believe (B2).

• Describe some of the ways in which people use music in worship, and talk about how different kinds of music makes them feel (C1).

 • Ask good questions during a school visit about what happens in a church, synagogue or mosque (B1). Exceeding:

• Suggest meanings to religious songs, responding sensitively to ideas about thanking and praising (A2).

• Show that they have begun to be aware that some people regularly worship God in different ways and in different places (B3)

• Talk about how the words ‘sacred’ and ‘holy’ are used; what makes some places and things special, sacred or holy; consider what things and places are special to pupils and their families, and why; do they have things that are holy and sacred?

• Talk about why it is important to show respect for other people’s precious or sacred belongings (including the importance of having clean hands or dressing in certain ways).

• Explore the main features of places of worship in Christianity and at least one other religion, ideally by visiting some places of worship.

 • Find out how the place of worship is used and talk to some Christians, Muslims and/or Jewish people about how and why it is important in their lives.

• Notice some similarities and differences between places of worship and how they are used.

• Explore the meanings of signs, symbols, artefacts and actions and how they help in worship e.g. o church: altar, cross, crucifix, font, lectern, candles and the symbol of light; plus specific features from different denominations as appropriate: icons, stations of the cross; baptismal pool; pulpit o synagogue: ark, Ner Tamid, Torah scroll, tzitzit (tassels), tefillin, tallit (prayer shawl) and kippah (skullcap), hanukkiah, bimah o mosque/masjid: wudu; calligraphy, prayer mat, prayer beads, minbar, mihrab, muezzin.

• Explore how religious believers sometimes use music to help them in worship e.g. Christians singing traditional hymns with an organ or using contemporary songs and instruments to praise God, thank God, say sorry, to prepare for prayer etc; children’s songs to help learn stories; to celebrate at a wedding.

 

Key Question: 1.6 How and why do we celebrate special and sacred times?

The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own

Strand / Questions/ Religions

Learning outcomes

 (intended to enable pupils to achieve end of key stage outcomes)

Suggested content for learning:

Teachers can select content from these examples, and add more of their own

Strand: Expressing Recommended Y1 & Y2 Questions in this thread: F4 Which times are special and why? L2.5 Why are festivals important to religious communities? U

2.5 Is it better to express your beliefs in arts and architecture or in charity and generosity?

 3.7 How can people express the spiritual through the arts?

Religions and worldviews: Christians, Jewish people and/or Muslims

Teachers will enable pupils to be able to achieve some of these outcomes, as appropriate to their age and stage: Emerging:

• Identify a special time they celebrate and explain simply what celebration means (A1).

• Talk about ways in which Jesus was a special person who Christians believe is the Son of God (A2). Expected:

 • Identify some ways Christians celebrate Christmas/Easter/Harvest/Pentecost and some ways a festival is celebrated in another religion (A1).

• Re-tell stories connected with Christmas/ Easter/Harvest/Pentecost and a festival in another religion and say why these are important to believers (A2).

• Ask questions and suggest answers about stories to do with Christian festivals and a story from a festival in another religion (B1). • Collect examples of what people do, give, sing, remember or think about at the religious celebrations studied, and say why they matter to believers (C1). Exceeding:

• Suggest meanings for some symbols and actions used in religious celebrations, including Easter/Christmas, Chanukah and/or Eid-ul-Fitr (A3).

• Identify some similarities and differences between the celebrations studied (B3).

• Consider the importance and value of celebration and remembrance in children’s own lives.

• Learn about festivals in Christianity, including Christmas, Easter, Harvest and Pentecost in Christianity: the stories and meanings associated with them.

• For example, from Easter: o Explore stories of Jesus in Holy Week such as riding into Jerusalem on a donkey, turning over tables in the temple, washing his friends’ feet, being arrested, being deserted, crucifixion, resurrection on Sunday morning. o Explore feelings of Jesus and disciples. o Explore how these are shown in the ways Christians celebrate Easter today e.g. Palm Sunday processions; washing feet; sorrow of Good Friday; darkness on Saturday services; light and joy of Easter day etc.

• Learn about the significance of festivals to the Jewish way of life and what they mean, e.g. Shabbat (Genesis 1; God as creator), Pesach (Moses and the Exodus; freedom), Chanukah (hope and dedication), Sukkot (reliance on God).

• Explore the meaning and significance of Jewish rituals and practices during each festival.

• Learn about how Muslims celebrate Eid-ul-Fitr as the completion of a month of fasting (Ramadan). Find out what happens in a Muslim household at Eid-ulFitr.

 • Talk about what the stories and events means for the children themselves.

• Compare the importance of the symbol of light within different festivals, e.g. Christmas, Chanukah; how believers express beliefs through this symbol, and how light can mean different things to believers in different communities.

 

Key Question: 1.7 What does it mean to belong to a faith community?

The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own.

Strand / Questions/ Religions

Learning outcomes

 (intended to enable pupils to achieve end of key stage outcomes) :

Suggested content for learning:

Teachers can select content from these examples, and add more of their own

Strand: Living Recommended Y1 Questions in this thread:

F5 Where do we belong?

L2.7 What does it mean to be a Christian in Britain today?

 L2.8 What does it mean to be a Hindu in Britain today?

U2.6 What does it mean to be a Muslim in Britain today?

 3.8 What is good and what is challenging about being a teenage Sikh or Buddhist or Muslim in Britain today?

Religions and worldviews: Christians, Muslims and/or Jewish people

Teachers will enable pupils to be able to achieve some of these outcomes, as appropriate to their age and stage: Emerging:

• Talk about what is special and of value about belonging to a group that is important to them (B2).

• Show an awareness that some people belong to different religions (B1). Expected:

• Recognise and name some symbols of belonging from their own experience, for Christians and at least one other religion, suggesting what these might mean and why they matter to believers (A3).

 • Give an account of what happens at a traditional Christian infant baptism /dedication and suggest what the actions and symbols mean (A1).

• Identify two ways people show they belong to each other when they get married (A1).

• Respond to examples of co-operation between different people (C2) Exceeding: • Give examples of ways in which believers express their identity and belonging within faith communities, responding sensitively to differences (B2).

 • Identify some similarities and differences between the ceremonies studied (B3)

• Talk about stories of people who belong to groups; groups to which children belong, including their families and school, what they enjoy about them and why they are important to them.

• Find out about some symbols of ‘belonging’ used in Christianity and at least one other religion, and what they mean (Christianity e.g. baptismal candles, christening clothes, crosses as badges or necklaces, fish/ICHTHUS badges, What Would Jesus Do bracelets WWJD); symbols of belonging in children’s own lives and experience. • Explore the idea that everyone is valuable and how Christians show this through infant baptism and dedication, finding out what the actions and symbols mean.

• Compare this with a welcoming ceremony from another religion e.g. Judaism: naming ceremony for girls – brit bat or zeved habat; Islam: Aqiqah. • Find out how people can show they belong with another person, for example, through the promises made in a wedding ceremony, through symbols (e.g. rings, gifts; standing under the chuppah in Jewish weddings). Listen to some music used at Christian weddings. Find out about what the words mean in promises, hymns and prayers at a wedding.

 • Compare the promises made in a Christian wedding with the Jewish ketubah (wedding contract).

• Talk to some Christians, and members of another religion, about what is good about being in a community, and what kinds of things they do when they meet in groups for worship and community activities.

• Explore the idea that different people belong to different religions, and that some people are not part of religious communities.

• Find out about times when people from different religions work together, e.g. in charity work or to remember special events. Examples might include Christian Aid and Islamic Relief or Remembrance on 11th November

 

Key Question: 1.8 How should we care for others and the world, and why does it matter?

The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own

Strand / Questions/ Religions

Learning outcomes

 (intended to enable pupils to achieve end of key stage outcomes) :

Suggested content for learning:

 Teachers can select content from these examples, and add more of their own

Strand: Living Recommended Y1 or Y2 Questions in this thread:

F6. What is special about our world?

 L2.9 What can we learn from religions about deciding what is right and wrong?

U2.7 What matters most to Christians and Humanists?

U2.8 What difference does it make to believe in…?

3.10 Does religion help people to be good?

 3.11 What difference does it make to believe in…?

 3.12 Is religion a power for peace or a cause of conflict in the world today?

 Religions and worldviews: Christians and Jewish people

Teachers will enable pupils to achieve some of these outcomes, as appropriate to their age and stage: Emerging:

• Talk about how religions teach that people are valuable, giving simple examples (B1).

• Recognise that some people believe God created the world and so we should look after it (A2). Expected:

• Re-tell Bible stories and stories from another faith about caring for others and the world (A2).

• Identify ways that some people make a response to God by caring for others and the world (B1).

• Talk about issues of good and bad, right and wrong arising from the stories (C3).

• Talk about some texts from different religions that promote the ‘Golden Rule’, and think about what would happen if people followed this idea more (C2)

• Use creative ways to express their own ideas about the creation story and what it says about what God is like (C1). Exceeding:

• Give examples of ways in which believers put their beliefs about others and the world into action, making links with religious stories (B1).

 • Answer the title question thoughtfully, in the light of their learning in this unit (C1).

• Introduce the idea that each person is unique and important, using e.g. Christian teachings that God values everyone (Matthew 6.26); Jesus blesses the children (Matthew 19, Mark 10, Luke 18); Psalm 8 (David praises God’s creation and how each person is special in it).

• Talk about the benefits and responsibilities of friendship and the ways in which people care for others. Explore stories from the Bible about friendship and care for others and how these show ideas of good and bad, right and wrong, e.g. Jesus’ special friends (Luke 5 v.1–11), four friends take the paralysed man to Jesus (Luke 5 v 17–26), ‘The good Samaritan’ (Luke 10: 25–37).

 • Consider the idea that we all have special gifts we can use to benefit others.

• Learn that some religions believe that serving others and supporting the poor are important parts of being a religious believer e.g. Zakat, alms giving, in Islam; tzedekah (charity) in Judaism.

 • Read stories about how some people have been inspired to care for people because of their religious beliefs e.g. Mother Teresa, Dr Barnardo, Sister Frances Dominica; people known in the local area.

• Having studied the teachings of one religion on caring, work together as a group to create an event e.g. a ‘Thank you’ tea party for some school helpers – make cakes and thank-you cards, write invitations and provide cake and drink, or organise a small fund-raising event and donate the money to a local charity.

 • Look carefully at some texts from different religious scriptures about the ‘Golden Rule’ and see if the children can suggest times when it has been followed and times when it has not been followed. Talk about how the golden rule can make life better for everyone. Make cartoons to show their ideas.

• Explore the creation account in Genesis 1 in varied and creative ways, to find out what it tells Jewish and Christian believers about what God is like, and what these stories tell believers about God and creation (e.g. that God is great, creative, and concerned with creation; that creation is important, that humans are important within it). • Explore the account in Genesis 2. Talk about ways in which religious believers might treat the world, making connections with the Genesis account (e.g. humans are important but have a role as God’s representatives on God’s creation, to care for it, as a gardener tends a garden). Investigate ways that people can look after the world and think of good reasons they this is important. Make links with the Jewish idea of tikkun olam (repairing the world) and Tu B’shevat (new year for trees).

 

LKS2

Key Question L2.1: What do different people believe about God?

The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own

Strand / Questions/ Religions

Learning outcomes

 (intended to enable pupils to achieve end of key stage outcomes)

Suggested content for learning:

Teachers can select content from these examples, and add more of their own

Strand: Believing

 

Recommended Y3

 

Questions in this thread:

1.1-3 Who is Christian/ Muslim / Jewish and what do they believe?

U2.1 Why do some people believe God exists?

 3.2 Do we need to prove God’s existence?

 

Religions and worldviews Christians, Hindus or Muslims

Teachers will enable pupils to be able to achieve some of these outcomes, as appropriate to their age and stage:

 Emerging:

• Identify beliefs about God that are held by Christians, Hindus and/or Muslims (B1).

• Retell and suggest the meanings of stories from sacred texts about people who encountered God (A1).

 Expected:

• Describe some of the ways in which Christians Hindus and/or Muslims describe God (A1).

• Ask questions and suggest some of their own responses to ideas about God (C1).

• Suggest why having a faith or belief in something can be hard (B2).

• Identify how and say why it makes a difference in people’s lives to believe in God (B1).

 Exceeding:

• Identify some similarities and differences between ideas about what God is like in different religions (B3).

• Discuss and present their own ideas about why there are many ideas about God and express their own understanding of God through words, symbols and the arts (C1).

• Talk about ways in which we exercise trust and faith in our everyday lives.

 • Find some examples of how we know about something we have not seen or experienced for ourselves.

• What do people believe about God? Explore some of the ways in which religions name and describe the attributes of God – with a particular focus on how Christians think of God as Trinity – Father, Son and Holy Spirit; the 99 Names of Allah; or Hindu beliefs about the Trimurti – Brahma (creator), Vishnu (preserver), Shiva (destroyer).

 • Study art (Christians), calligraphy (Muslims) and/or murtis (Hindus) used to represent ideas about God to find out what they say about God.

• Explore how ideas about God are shown in stories/narratives: E.g. encounters which help believers to understand God’s relationship with people e.g., Moses and the Burning Bush (Exodus 3.1–15), Jonah (book of Jonah in the Old Testament); Baptism of Jesus (Mark 1.9–11); Pentecost (Acts 2. 1–21) and Paul's conversion (Acts 9. 1–19); stories Jesus told which teach about God e.g. the parable of the Forgiving Father (Luke 15.11–32).

• Hindu texts which describe the indescribable (e.g. extract some of the more concrete metaphors from Bhagavad Gita 7:8–9 and 10:21–41; [http://www.asitis.com/7/ ] or the poem ‘Who?’ by Sri Aurobindo).

• Explore stories which help Muslims understand the nature of God e.g. the story of the Night of Power – the revelation of the Qur’an to Muhammad, and the story of Muhammad’s night journey and ascension.

• Examine similarities and differences between these views of God.

• Explore the influence believing in God has on the lives of believers.

• Explore the fact that many people do not believe in God.

 • Reflect on pupils’ own questions and ideas about God in light of their learning.

• Express their own ideas about God through art, music, poetry or drama

 

Key Question L2.2: Why is the Bible important for Christians today?

The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own

Strand / Questions/ Religions

Learning outcomes

 (intended to enable pupils to achieve end of key stage outcomes)

Suggested content for learning:

Teachers can select content from these examples, and add more of their own

Strand: Believing

 

Recommended Y3

 

Questions in this thread:

F1 Which stories are special and why?

1.4 What can we learn from sacred books?

3.2 Does living biblically mean obeying the whole Bible?

 

 Religious traditions and worldviews Christians

Teachers will enable pupils to be able to achieve some of these outcomes, as appropriate to their age and stage: Emerging:

• Recall and name some Bible stories that inspire Christians (A2).

 • Identify at least two ways Christians use the Bible in everyday life (B1).

Expected:

• Make connections between stories in the Bible and what Christians believe about creation, the Fall and salvation (A2).

 • Give examples of how and suggest reasons why Christians use the Bible today (B1)

• Describe some ways Christians say God is like, with examples from the Bible, using different forms of expression (A1).

• Discuss their own and others’ ideas about why humans do bad things and how people try to put things right (C3).

Exceeding:

• Explain how the Bible uses different kinds of stories to tell a big story (A2).

• Suggest why Christians believe that God needs to rescue/save human beings (B2).

• Talk about sources of guidance and wisdom in their own and others’ lives: who or what helps them to decide how to live? Introduce the Bible as a guide for Christians.

• Give pupils a brief introduction to the Christian Bible – Old and New Testaments, divided into books, chapters and verses; different types of writing (illustrate with two examples e.g. histories; laws; poems; prayers; biographies (Gospels); letters) (be clear that what Christians call the ‘Old Testament’ is Jewish scripture too).

• Introduce pupils to the idea that for Christians, the Bible tells them about what God is like. It also tells a ‘big story’ of God’s dealings with human beings: God loves humans and created a wonderful world for people (creation); humans disobey God and go their own way (‘the Fall’); God sends his Son, Jesus (incarnation) to save people – to bring them back to God (salvation). This story explains why Christians think they need to say sorry to God, why they try to follow Jesus, and why they are grateful to God for sending Jesus. It shows why Christians think the Bible is still important because it tells them about how to live, and why they should follow God.

• Creation: Read Genesis 1 (use a lively children’s version). Ask pupils to create dance/movement actions for each day, or art work to reflect the narrative; focus on what the narrative shows God is like – powerful, creative, good etc.

• Find out what good and bad things people sometimes do. Explore idea of temptation: what things are tempting? Why do we give in sometimes? Do we sometimes blame others? Tell the story of Adam and Eve giving in to temptation (Genesis 3 – often called ‘the Fall’). Does the way the people behave sound familiar? What lessons do pupils think Christians might learn from this story? Think about why Christians say people need to ask God to forgive them.

• Explore creatively the Lost Coin, Sheep and Son stories (Luke 15) and how Christians interpret them as showing how much God wants ‘sinners’ to turn back to him; ask some Christians what they mean when they say Jesus saves or rescues them.

• Look at some examples of how Christians use the Bible – for everyday prayer and Bible reading (often using notes), in Bible study groups; read aloud in church, with people talking about the meaning. What are the good things and the difficult things people might find from trying to follow this book in day-to-day life?

 

Key Question L2.3: Why is Jesus inspiring to some people?

The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own

Strand / Questions/ Religions

Learning outcomes

 (intended to enable pupils to achieve end of key stage outcomes)

Suggested content for learning:

Teachers can select content from these examples, and add more of their own

Strand: Believing

Recommended Y4

 

Questions in this thread: F2 Which people are special and why?

U2.2 What would Jesus do?

Can we live by the values of Jesus in the twenty-first century?

 3.3 What is so radical about Jesus?

 

 Religions and worldviews Christian

Teachers will enable pupils to be able to achieve some of these outcomes, as appropriate to their age and stage:

Emerging:

• Ask questions raised by the stories and life of Jesus and followers today, and give examples of how Christians are inspired by Jesus (B1).

• Suggest some ideas about good ways to treat others, arising from their learning (C3). Expected:

• Make connections between some of Jesus’ teachings and the way Christians live today (A1).

• Describe how Christians celebrate Holy Week and Easter Sunday (A1).

• Identify the most important parts of Easter for Christians and say why they are important (B1).

• Give simple definitions of some key Christian terms (e.g. gospel, incarnation, salvation) and illustrate them with events from Holy Week and Easter (A2).

 Exceeding:

• Make connections between the Easter story of Jesus and the wider ‘big story’ of the Bible (creation, the Fall, incarnation, salvation) – see unit L2.2), reflecting on why this inspires Christians (A1).

• Present their own ideas about the most important attitudes and values to have today, making links with Christian values (C2).

• Briefly explore what makes a person inspirational to others, identifying characteristics of a good role model.

• Explore creatively some words and actions of Jesus which continue to inspire Christians today e.g parables of the kingdom of heaven (Matthew 13:1–45; sower, mustard seed, pearl etc.); parables of forgiveness (good Samaritan, Luke 10:29–37; two debtors, Luke 7:36–50; unforgiving servant, Matthew 18:21–35); hot-seat characters, freeze-frame or act out stories; create artworks; collect pupils’ questions, then find out how Christians interpret these by asking some.

• Use the events of Holy Week and Easter to find out why Jesus is so important to Christians today; how are the events of Holy Week celebrated by Christians, e.g. Palm Sunday, waving palms; Maundy Thursday, washing feet; sorrow of Good Friday services; darkness in churches on Saturday; light and joy of Easter Day.

• Explore the question: why do Christians call Good Friday ‘good’? Include the terms incarnation (Jesus as God as a human being) and salvation (Christians believe that Jesus’ death and resurrection opens up a way for people to be forgiven and get close to God) (see Unit L2.2 for more on these terms).

• Find out about the impact that believing in Jesus can have on a Christian’s life and how Jesus has inspired some examples of contemporary inspirational Christians, e.g. how Christians show gratitude to Jesus for saving them and dealing with sin and death and bringing forgiveness – by prayer, worship, giving generously, telling other people about Jesus, caring for others.

• Introduce the belief that Christians cannot be completely good and so they rely on the Holy Spirit to help them follow Jesus and be more like him (see the ‘fruit of the Spirit, Galatians 5:22–23).

• Follow this up with examples of what some Christians say are the most important attitudes and values to have, as inspired by Jesus’ teachings and actions (e.g. love, fairness, service, sacrifice, joy) comparing these with what pupils believe to be most important

 

Key Question L2.4 Why do people pray?

The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own

Strand / Questions/ Religions

Learning outcomes

 (intended to enable pupils to achieve end of key stage outcomes)

Suggested content for learning:

Teachers can select content from these examples, and add more of their own

Strand: Expressing

 

 Questions in this thread:

 

F3 Which places are special and why?

1.5 What makes some places sacred?

 U2.4 If God is everywhere, why go to a place of worship?

 3.6 Should religious buildings be sold to feed the starving?

 

Religions and worldviews Christians, Hindus and/or Muslim

Teachers will enable pupils to be able to achieve some of these outcomes, as appropriate to their age and stage: Emerging:

• Describe what some believers say and do when they pray (A1).

• Respond thoughtfully to examples of how praying helps religious believers (B2).

Expected:

• Describe the practice of prayer in the religions studied (A2).

• Make connections between what people believe about prayer and what they do when they pray (A3).

• Describe ways in which prayer can comfort and challenge believers (B2).

 • Describe and comment on similarities and differences between how Christians, Muslims and Hindus pray (B3).

Exceeding:

• Explain similarities and differences between how people pray (B3).

• Consider and evaluate the significance of prayer in the lives of people today (A1)

• Discover and think about the meanings of the words of key prayers in three religions – e.g. the Muslim First Surah of the Qur’an, the Christian Lord’s Prayer and the Hindu Gayatri Mantra.

• Learn that Hindus, Muslims and Christians pray in many different ways, both using set forms of words and more spontaneously, and the three religions believe similar and different ideas about how God hears prayers.

 • Consider the idea that some people are spiritual but not religious and like to pray in their own way.

• Consider the idea that some people are atheists who believe it is more use to be kind or to help someone than to pray for them.

• Find out about some symbols used in prayers in different religions.

• Explore connections between prayer in three different religions.

• Explore the impact of prayer: Does it enable people to feel calm, hopeful, inspired, close to God or challenged? How?

• Ask good questions about answered and unanswered prayer and find out some answers to these questions.

 • Discuss and consider the impact of praying in some stories from inside the religions, e.g. stories of answered prayer, or of the origin of a prayer in ancient India, in Jesus’ teaching or in the Holy Qur’an.

• Make links between beliefs and practice of prayer in different religions.

• Weigh up the value and impact of these key ideas for themselves

 

Key Question L2.5: Why are festivals important to religious communities?

The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own

Strand / Questions/ Religions

Learning outcomes

 (intended to enable pupils to achieve end of key stage outcomes)

Suggested content for learning:

Teachers can select content from these examples, and add more of their own

Strand: Expressing

Recommended Y3 & Y4

Questions in this thread:

F4 Which times are special and why?

 1.6 How and why do we celebrate special and sacred times?

U2.5 Is it better to express your beliefs in arts and architecture or in charity and generosity?

 3.7 How can people express the spiritual through the arts?

 

Religions and worldviews: Christians plus Hindus and/or Jewish people and/or Muslims

 

Note: Schools may want to explore major festivals each year; if so, they should ensure that there is progression in pupils’ learning across the age range. Note also the overlap with Key Question 2.4, which explores Easter in the context of Jesus’s life

Teachers will enable pupils to be able to achieve some of these outcomes, as appropriate to their age and stage: Emerging:

• Recognise and identify some differences between religious festivals and other types of celebrations (B2).

• Retell some stories behind festivals (e.g. Christmas, Divali, Pesach) (A2).

Expected:

• Make connections between stories, symbols and beliefs with what happens in at least two festivals (A2).

• Ask questions and give ideas about what matters most to believers in festivals (e.g. Easter, Eid) (B2).

• Identify similarities and differences in the way festivals are celebrated within and between religions (A3).

• Explore and suggest ideas about what is worth celebrating and remembering in religious communities and in their own lives (C1).

 Exceeding:

• Discuss and present their own responses about the role of festivals in the life of Britain today, showing their understanding of the values and beliefs at the heart of each festival studied, using a variety of media (C2). • Suggest how and why religious festivals are valuable to many people (B2).

• Think about times in their own lives when pupils remember and celebrate significant events/people, and why and how they do this

 • Consider the meanings of the stories behind key religious festivals, e.g Christmas, Easter, Pentecost, Harvest in Christianity, Diwali in Hinduism, Pesach, Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur in Judaism, Eid in Islam.

• Describe how believers express the meaning of religious festivals through symbols, sounds, actions, story and rituals.

• notice and think about similarities and differences between the way festival are celebrated e.g. Christmas or Holy Week within different Christian traditions; between home and places of worship.

• study key elements of festival: shared values, story, beliefs, hopes and commitments.

• Consider (using Philosophy for Children methods where possible) questions about the deep meaning of the festivals: does light conquer darkness (Diwali)? Is love stronger than death (Easter)? Can God free people from slavery (Pesach)? Is it good to say sorry (Yom Kippur)? Does fasting make you a better person? How? (Ramadan and Eid-ulFitr; Lent).

 • Explore the benefits of celebration to religious communities by asking some local believers: why do they keep on celebrating ancient events?

• Consider questions about the role of festivals in the life of Britain today: Is Comic Relief day a bigger festival than Easter? Should everyone be allowed a day off work for their festivals? Is Christmas for the Christians or for everyone? Can the real meaning of a festival be preserved, or do the shops and shopping always take over?

 

Key Question L2.6: Why do some people think that life is a journey? What significant experiences mark this?

 The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their ow

Strand / Questions/ Religions

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 (intended to enable pupils to achieve end of key stage outcomes)

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Strand: Expressing

 Recommended Y4

Questions in this thread: FS:

 Which times are special and why? 1.6 How and why do we celebrate special and sacred times?

Religions and worldviews: Christians, Hindus and/or Jewish people

 

NB Question U2.3 (What do religions say to us when life gets hard?) will explore beliefs about death and afterlife in Upper KS2, so this unit need only introduce some key ideas and ways believers mark the end of life

Teachers will enable pupils to be able to achieve some of these outcomes, as appropriate to their age and stage: Emerging:

• Recall and name some of the ways religions mark milestones of commitment (including marriage) (A1).

 • Identify at least two promises made by believers at these ceremonies and say why they are important (B1).

Expected:

• Suggest why some people see life as a journey and identify some of the key milestones on this journey (A2).

 • Describe what happens in Christian, Jewish, and/or Hindu ceremonies of commitment and say what these rituals mean (A3).

• Suggest reasons why marking the milestones of life are important to Christians, Hindus and/or Jewish people (B2).

• Link up some questions and answers about how believers show commitment with their own ideas about community, belonging and belief (C1).

Exceeding:

• Explain similarities and differences between ceremonies of commitment (B3).

• Discuss and present their own ideas about the value and challenge of religious commitment in Britain today (C2).

• Explore and use the religious metaphor of life as a journey. What are the significant milestones on this journey? What other metaphors could be used for life?

• Consider the value and meaning of ceremonies which mark milestones in life, particularly those associated with growing up and taking responsibility within a faith community: in Christianity, confirmation and ‘believers’ baptism’ or adult baptism, first communion and confession (Roman Catholic); sacred thread ceremony in Hinduism; bar/bat mitzvah/chayil in Judaism. Explore the symbols and rituals used, and the promises made. Do non-religious people e.g. Humanists mark these moments?

• What meaning do these ceremonies have to the individual, their family and their communities?

 • Rank, sort and order some different commitments held by believers in different religions – and by the pupils themselves.

• Think about the symbolism, meaning and value of ceremonies that mark the commitment of a loving relationship between two people: compare marriage ceremonies and commitments in two religious traditions. What promises are made? Why are they important? Compare with non-religious ceremonies.

• Explore some basic ideas about what Christians, Hindus and Jewish people believe about life after death; how do they mark the end of life?

• Work with the metaphor of life as a journey: what might be the signposts, guidebooks, stopping points or traffic jams? Does religious or spiritual teaching help believers to move on in life’s journey?

 • Create a ‘map of life’ for a Hindu, Jewish or Christian person, showing what these religions offer to guide people through life’s journey. Can anyone learn from another person’s ‘map of life’? Is a religion like a ‘map of life’?

• Reflect on their own ideas about community, belonging and belief

 

Key Question L2.7 What does it mean to be a Christian in Britain today?

The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own

Strand / Questions/ Religions

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 (intended to enable pupils to achieve end of key stage outcomes)

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Strand: Living

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Questions in this thread:

F5 Where do we belong?

1.7 What does it mean to belong to a faith community?

 L2.8 What does it mean to be a Hindu in Britain today?

U2.6 What does it meant to be a Muslim in Britain today?

3.8 What is good and what is challenging about being a teenage Buddhist, Sikh or Muslim in Britain today?

 

Religions and worldviews: Christian

Teachers will enable pupils to be able to achieve some of these outcomes, as appropriate to their age and stage: Emerging:

• Identify and name examples of what Christians have and do in their families and at church to show their faith (A3).

• Ask good questions about what Christians do to show their faith (B1).

Expected:

• Describe some examples of what Christians do to show their faith, and make connections with some Christian beliefs and teachings (A1).

• Describe some ways in which Christian express their faith through hymns and modern worship songs (A2).

• Suggest at least two reasons why being a Christian is a good thing in Britain today, and two reasons why it might be hard sometimes (B2).

• Discuss links between the actions of Christians in helping others and ways in which people of other faiths and beliefs, including pupils themselves, help others (C2).

Exceeding:

• Explain similarities and differences between at least two different ways of worshipping in two different Christian churches (A3). • Discuss and present ideas about what it means to be a Christian in Britain today, making links with their own experiences (C1).

Find out about how Christians show their faith within their families. What objects might you find in a Christian’s home and why? E.g. Bible, cross/crucifix, palm cross, pictures of Jesus or the holy family (Mary, Joseph and Jesus), Christian magazines, CDs of Christian music, some Bible verses on the fridge. What kinds of things would Christian families do during the week? E.g. grace before meals, family prayers and Bible reading, private prayer and Bible reading, giving money to charity. Talk about which objects and actions are most important and why. What similarities and differences are there with the family values and home rituals of pupils in the class? • Explore what Christians do to show their faith within their church communities. What do they do together and why? Explore church noticeboards or websites to find out what goes on in at least two different kinds of churches (e.g. Anglican, Baptist, Roman Catholic, Pentecostal), and some of the similarities and differences between what Christians do there. E.g. Sunday school classes, ‘Messy Church’, Girls Brigade, Boys’ Brigade, Sunday services, different types of worship music, home groups. Ask some teenagers from two churches about how they show their faith.

• Find out what Christians do to show their faith in how they help their local community. Choose one or two local churches to illustrate local involvement, e.g. in food banks, running crèches and toddler groups, supporting those in need (e.g. St Vincent de Paul Society), running ‘Christians Against Poverty’ money management courses, Alpha Courses, cake sales, visiting the sick, etc. Obviously, Christians are not the only people who do these things, but find out why Christians and others do work hard to help people in their communities. What kinds of things do pupils at your school do to help others, and why?

• Find out about some ways in which Christians make a difference in the worldwide community. How do they show that they are Christians? E.g. Mother Teresa, Pope Francis, Archbishop Justin Welby, Loretta Minghella (Director of Christian Aid). See if there are local Christians who are involved in fighting for justice etc

 

Key Question L2.8 What does it mean to be a Hindu in Britain today?

The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own

Strand / Questions/ Religions

Learning outcomes

 (intended to enable pupils to achieve end of key stage outcomes)

Suggested content for learning:

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Strand: Living

Recommended Y4

 

Questions in this thread:

 F5: Where do we belong?

1.7 What does it mean to belong to a faith community?

L2.7 What does it mean to be a Christian in Britain today?

U2.6 What does it meant to be a Muslim in Britain today?

3.8 What is good and what is challenging about being a teenage Buddhist, Sikh or Muslim in Britain today?

 

Religions and worldviews: Hindus

Teachers will enable pupils to be able to achieve some of these outcomes, as appropriate to their age and stage: Emerging:

• Identify and name examples of what Hindus have and do in their families and at mandir to show their faith (A3).

• Ask good questions about what Hindus do to show their faith (B1). E

xpected:

• Describe some examples of what Hindus do to show their faith, and make connections with some Hindu beliefs and teachings about aims and duties in life (A1). • Describe some ways in which Hindus express their faith through puja, aarti and bhajans (A2).

• Suggest at least two reasons why being a Hindu is a good thing in Britain today, and two reasons why it might be hard sometimes (B2).

• Discuss links between the actions of Hindus in helping others and ways in which people of other faiths and beliefs, including pupils themselves, help others (C2).

Exceeding:

• Explain similarities and differences between Hindu worship and worship in another religious tradition pupils have been taught (B3).

• Discuss and present ideas about what it means to be a Hindu in Britain today, making links with their own experiences (C1)

• Find out about how Hindus show their faith within their families. Note that what RE calls ‘Hinduism’ is called ‘Sanatana Dharma’ within the tradition – i.e. ‘Eternal Way’. It is incredibly diverse as a whole way of life rather than a set of beliefs. What objects might you find in a Hindu’s home and why? E.g. murtis, family shrine, statues and pictures of deities, puja tray including incense, fruit, bells, flowers, candles; some sacred texts such as the Bhagavad Gita, OM symbols. What kinds of things would Hindu families do during the week? Daily puja, blessing food, aarti ceremony, singing hymns, reading holy texts, visit the temple etc. Talk about which objects and actions are most important and why. What similarities and differences are there with the family values and home rituals of pupils in the class? • Explore Hindu ideas about the four aims of life (punusharthas) dharma: religious or moral duty; artha: economic development, providing for family and society by honest means; kama: regulated enjoyment of the pleasures and beauty of life; moksha: liberation from the cycle of birth and rebirth; reincarnation. Compare these with pupils’ goals for living.

• Explore Hindu ideas of karma – how actions bring good or bad karma. Find out how and why ‘snakes and ladders’ links with Hindu ideas of karma.

• Explore what Hindus do to show their tradition within their faith communities. What do they do together and why? E.g. visiting the temple/mandir, performing rituals, including prayer, praise such as singing hymns/songs (bhajans), offerings before the murtis, sharing and receiving prashad (an apple or sweet) representing the grace of God; looking at Hindu iconography – how do the different images show the different characters and attributes of the deities? Ask some Hindu teenagers about how they show their faith.

• Find out about some ways in which Hindus make a difference in the worldwide community. How does a Hindu way of life guide them in how they live? E.g. Mahatma Gandhi, Pandurang Shastri Athavale

 

Key Question L2.9 What can we learn from religions about deciding what is right and wrong?

The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own

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Strand; Living

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 Questions in this thread:

1.8 How should we care for others and the world, and why does it matter?

U2.7 What matters most to Christians and Humanists?

 3.10 Does religion help people to be good?

 

Religions and worldviews Christians, Jewish people, non-religious (e.g. Humanist)

Teachers will enable pupils to be able to achieve some of these outcomes, as appropriate to their age and stage: Emerging:

 • Recall and talk about some rules for living in religious traditions (B2).

• Find out at least two teachings from religions about how to live a good life (C3). Expected:

• Give examples of rules for living from religions and suggest ways in which they might help believers with difficult decisions (B1).

• Make connections between stories of temptation and why people can find it difficult to be good (A2).

• Give examples of ways in which some inspirational people have been guided by their religion (B1).

• Discuss their own and others’ ideas about how people decide right and wrong (C3).

Exceeding:

• Explain some similarities and differences between the codes for living used by Christians and the followers of at least one other religion or non-religious belief system (B3).

• Express ideas about right and wrong, good and bad for themselves, including ideas about love, forgiveness, honesty, kindness and generosity (C3)

• Explore teachings which act as guides for living within Judaism, Christianity, and a nonreligious belief system, e.g. the Ten Commandments (Exodus 20:1–21, Deuteronomy 5:1– 22), the Two Commandments of Jesus (Mark 12:28–34), the golden rule for Humanists. Work out what people must have been doing if they needed to be given those rules. Do people still behave like that? What difference would it make if people keep these guides for living?

• Use religious stories to explore the idea of temptation, and how it affects how people choose between good and bad, e.g. in Christianity, use Genesis 3 and the ‘Fall’, and Jesus resisting temptation in Matthew 4.

• Share teachings from different religions that give examples of how to live ‘a good life’, e.g. Jewish teachings about being thankful (the Talmud teaches that Jews should say thank you 100 times a day! The Siddur prayer book contains numerous ‘baruch atah Adonai’ prayers - ‘Blessed are you, King of the universe’); or Christian teaching from Jesus on the Beatitudes (Matthew 5: 2–13).

 • Talk about how pupils learn the difference between right and wrong. Is it always clear? How do people know? Sometimes the commands or guidance from religions help people to work out what the right thing is. Consider how helpful it is to have guidance like this for making choices and decisions in everyday life. Is it sometimes difficult for believers to follow the guidance? If religions say that God inspires their rules for living, where do Humanists look for guidance?

• Explore some dilemmas where children have to choose between different actions, where some are clear-cut right/wrong, and others where they are a bit less clear. Explore whether it would be easier for a religious believer to decide.

• Explore the lives of some inspirational religious individuals (e.g. Desmond Tutu, Martin Luther King Jr). Consider how their religious faith inspired and guided them in their lives.

• Reflect on the value of love, forgiveness, honesty, kindness, generosity and service in their own lives and the lives of others, in the light of their studies in RE.

 

UKS2

Key Question U2.1 Why do some people believe God exists?

The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own.

Strand / Questions/ Religions

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Strand: Believing Recommended Y5 Questions in this thread: 1.1-3 Who is Christian/ Muslim / Jewish and what do they believe? L2.1 What do different people believe about God? 3.1 Do we need to prove God’s existence? Religions and worldviews Christians, non-religious e.g. Humanist

Teachers will enable pupils to be able to achieve some of these outcomes, as appropriate to their age and stage: Emerging: • Define the terms theist, atheist and agnostic and give examples of statements that reflect these beliefs (B1). • Give two reasons why a Christian believes in God and one why an atheist does not (A3). Expected: • Outline clearly a Christian understanding of what God is like, using examples and evidence (A2). • Give examples of ways in which believing in God is valuable in the lives of Christians, and ways in which it can be challenging (B2). • Express thoughtful ideas about the impact of believing or not believing in God on someone’s life (B1). • Present different views on why people believe in God or not, including their own ideas (C1). Exceeding: • Explain how Christians sometimes disagree about what God is like, giving examples of how they interpret texts differently (B3). • Enquire into what some atheists, agnostics and theists say about God, expressing their own ideas and arguments, using evidence and examples (C1).

• Find out about how many people in the world and in your local area believe in God – using global statistics and the 2011 UK census. Ask pupils why they think so many people believe in God. Collect these reasons. Find out about how many do not believe. Learn the words ‘theist’ (believes in God), agnostic (cannot say if God exists or not) and atheist (believes there is no god). • Set up an enquiry to explore the key question. Ask pupils to raise questions about the existence and nature of God. Focus on Christian ideas of God, in order to make this more manageable. Start by clarifying what Christians believe God is like. Build on learning from Key Question L2.1, and explore some of the names of God and metaphors for God in the Bible (e.g. God as Father, Spirit, Son, eternal, almighty, holy, shepherd, rock, fortress, light). If this God exists, what difference would ‘he’ make to the way people live? Make links with prior learning about the Bible and its ‘big story’ (Key Question L2.2). • Explore some reasons why people do or do not believe in God. Consider some of the main reasons. These include: family background – many people believe (or don’t believe) because of their home background; religious experience – many people say they have experienced a sense of ‘the presence of God’ or had prayer answered; many would argue that the universe, the Earth and life are extraordinary and are best explained as the result of an all-powerful Creator. Many people who do not believe in God point to the existence of terrible suffering as a key reason. Some argue that there is no need to use a Creator to explain the existence of the universe and life. • Consider ways in which Christians read the Genesis account of creation. Explore why some Christians read it literally; explore how lots of Christians read it as expressing some truths about God and human beings without reading it literally. Find out about Christians who are also scientists (e.g. Jennifer Wiseman, John Polkinghorne, Denis Alexander). • Invite some Christians, agnostics and atheists in to answer questions about why they do or do not believe in God. • Explore what impact believing in God might make on the way someone lives his or her everyday life. Talk about and reflect upon the possible benefits and challenges of believing or not believing in God in Britain today.

 

Key Question U2.2 What would Jesus do? (Can we live by the values of Jesus in the twenty-first century?)

The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own

Strand / Questions/ Religions

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Strand: Believing Recommended Y5 Questions in this thread: F2 Which people are special and why? L2.3 Why is Jesus inspiring to some people? 3.3 What is so radical about Jesus? Religions and worldviews: Christians

Teachers will enable pupils to be able to achieve some of these outcomes, as appropriate to their age and stage: Emerging: • Make connections between some of Jesus’ teachings and the way Christians live today (A1). • Discuss their own ideas about the importance of values to live by, comparing them to Christian ideas (C3). Expected: • Outline Jesus’ teaching on how his followers should live (A2). • Offer interpretations of two of Jesus’ parables and say what they might teach Christians about how to live (B3). • Explain the impact Jesus’ example and teachings might have on Christians today (B1). • Express their own understanding of what Jesus would do in relation to a moral dilemma from the world today (C3). Exceeding: • Explain the links between Jesus’ death on the cross and Christian belief in love and forgiveness, giving reasons why Christians want to follow Jesus (A2). • Investigate and explain the challenges of following Jesus’ teaching about love, forgiveness justice and/or generosity, expressing their own ideas (C3)

• Use stimulus material to encourage pupils to ask questions about life, death, suffering, and what matters most in life. • Analyse and evaluate pupils’ questions, to recognise and reflect on how some ‘big questions’ do not have easy answers, and how people offer different answers to some of the big questions about life, death, suffering etc. • Explore ways in which religions help people to live, even when times are tough, e.g. through prayer, giving a sense of purpose, a guide to deciding what is right and wrong, membership of a community who care for each other, opportunities to celebrate together. Ask some religious believers to explain how their faith has helped them in difficult times, and how it encourages them to enjoy life too. • Introduce the idea that most religious traditions teach about some form of life after death, which can bring comfort to people as they face suffering, or if they are bereaved. Teach pupils that some people believe that death is the end of life, and that there is no afterlife. • Learn some key concepts about life after death in Christianity (such as judgement, heaven, salvation through Jesus); and Hinduism (karma, soul, samsara, reincarnation and moksha); also one non-religious view about what happens after death, e.g. Humanism. • Look at examples of ‘art of heaven’ in which religious believers imagine the afterlife; explore how these art works reflect Christian, Hindu and non-religious beliefs; get pupils to respond with art work of their own. How do ideas of life after death help people in difficult times? • Consider similarities and differences in ceremonies that mark the end of life on Earth and how these express different beliefs. • Read and respond to prayers, liturgies, meditation texts and songs/hymns used when someone has died, and think about the questions and beliefs they address. • Reflect on and express clearly their own ideas, concerns and possibly worries about death and the idea of life beyond

 

Key Question U2.4 If God is everywhere, why go to a place of worship? The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own.

Strand / Questions/ Religions

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Strand: Expressing Recommended Y5 Questions in this thread: F3: Which places are special and why? 1.7: What makes some places sacred? L2.5: Why do people pray? 3.6: Should religious buildings be sold to feed the starving? Religions and worldviews: Christians, Hindus and Jewish people

Teachers will enable pupils to be able to achieve some of these outcomes, as appropriate to their age and stage: Emerging: • Recall and name some key features of places of worship studied (A1). • Find out about what believers say about their places of worship (C2). Expected: • Make connections between how believers feel about places of worship in different traditions (A3). • Select and describe the most important functions of a place of worship for the community (B3). • Give examples of how places of worship support believers in difficult times, explaining why this matters to believers (B2). • Present ideas about the importance of people in a place of worship, rather than the place itself (C1). Exceeding: • Outline how and why places of worship fulfil special functions in the lives of believers (A3). • Comment thoughtfully on the value and purpose of places of worship in religious communities (B1).

• Find out some of the key features of places of worship: e.g. some differences between Anglican and Baptist churches; mandir; differences between an Orthodox and a Reform synagogue. • Explore the duty of pilgrimage in Hinduism, which is seen as a wider part of worship. This concerns the need for Hindus to be seen by the deity worshipping at a particular shrine. Does this mean that God is concentrated more intensely in particular places? • Can pupils talk about a place where people might say or feel God is somehow more ‘present’? What is special about these places? • Consider images of the Western Wall in Jerusalem. Explore what this wall means to Jews worldwide. • Learn about the destruction of the Jewish temple, the ‘house of God’, in 70 CE. Find out what purpose modern synagogues serve in the absence of a ‘house of God’. • Consider these definitions: ‘synagogue’ = ‘house of assembly’ (a place to get together), also called ‘schul’ = school (a place to learn). Answer the key question in light of these definitions. • What different ways of worshipping can they find within Christianity? Reflect on why some Christians like to go to church to meet with God, and why some meet in a school or in a home; e.g. community, being part of the ‘body of Christ’, mutual support through prayer and encouragement, music vs meditation, silence, simplicity, nature; some don’t like institutions, hierarchies, crowds! Why do Christians worship in different ways? • Find out about alternative forms of Christian communities, e.g. www.freshexpressions.org.uk Consider the appeal of these to some Christians.

 

Key Question U2.5: Is it better to express your religion in arts and architecture or in charity and generosity? The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own.

Strand / Questions/ Religions

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 (intended to enable pupils to achieve end of key stage outcomes)

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Strand: Expressing: Recommended Y6 Questions in this thread: 3.7 How can people express the spiritual through the arts? Religions and worldviews Christians, Muslims and nonreligious, e.g. Humanists

Teachers will enable pupils to be able to achieve some of these outcomes, as appropriate to their age and stage: Emerging: • Respond with ideas of their own to the title question (B2). • Find out about religious teachings, charities and ways of expressing generosity (C3). Expected: • Describe and make connections between examples of religious creativity (buildings and art) (A1). • Show understanding of the value of sacred buildings and art (B3). • Suggest reasons why some believers see generosity and charity as more important than buildings and art (B2). • Apply ideas about values and from scriptures to the title question (C2). Exceeding:: • Outline how and why some Humanists criticise spending on religious buildings or art (A3). • Examine the title question from different perspectives, including their own (C1).

Find out about some great examples of religious art and architecture and present their reasons for choosing those they find most impressive; • Work in a small group and present to the class an example of the most impressive religious art or architecture. • Notice, list and explain similarities and differences between Christian and Muslim sacred buildings. • Discuss Muslim and Christian ideas (e.g. from scriptures) about the importance of being generous and charitable, ranking the ideas according to their importance, and applying them to issues about poverty and charity. • Consider why Christians and Muslims think giving money away is important, and what difference this makes, both to those who give and to those who receive. • Compare Christian and Muslim ideas about art (e.g. contrasting views on presenting or not presenting God or people in art; use of calligraphy/ geometrical art vs representational art). • Connect ways in which art and actions can reveal what people believe about God (e.g. cathedrals and mosques might express ideas of greatness and perfection of God; actions might suggest that God is concerned with justice). • Suggest reasons why some people may be critical of religious art/ architecture, and why some would defend it as important. • Weigh up which has greater impact – art or charity? Consider what the world would be like without great art or architecture. What about a world without charity or generosity?

 

Key Question U2.6 What does it mean to be a Muslim in Britain today? The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own.

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Strand: Living Recommended Y5 Questions in this thread: F5: Where do we belong? 1.7 What does it mean to belong to a faith community? L2.7 What does it mean to be a Christian in Britain today? L2.8 What does it mean to be a Hindu in Britain today? 3.8 What is good and what is challenging about being a teenage Buddhist, Sikh or Muslim in Britain today? Religions and worldviews: Muslims

Teachers will enable pupils to be able to achieve some of these outcomes, as appropriate to their age and stage: Emerging: • Describe the Five Pillars of Islam and give examples of how these affect the everyday lives of Muslims (A1). • Identify three reasons why the Holy Qur’an is important to Muslims, and how it makes a difference to how they live (B1). Expected: • Make connections between Muslim practice of the Five Pillars and their beliefs about God and the Prophet Muhammad (A2). • Describe and reflect on the significance of the Holy Qur’an to Muslims (B1). • Describe the forms of guidance a Muslim uses and compare them to forms of guidance experienced by the pupils (A2). • Make connections between the key functions of the mosque and the beliefs of Muslims (A1). Exceeding: • Comment thoughtfully on the value and purpose of religious practices and rituals in a Muslim’s daily life (B1). • Answer the title key question from different perspectives, including their own (C1).

• Find out what pupils already know about Islam (e.g. from key question 1.2); how many Muslims do they think there are in Britain and in your local area? Find out and talk about the information from the 2011 Census. • Explore the practice, meaning and significance of the Five Pillars of Islam as an expression of ibadah (worship and belief in action). Shahadah (belief in one God and his Prophet); salat (daily prayer); sawm (fasting); zakat (alms giving); hajj (pilgrimage). How do these affect the lives of Muslims, moment by moment, daily, annually, in a lifetime? • Think about and discuss the value and challenge for Muslims of following the Five Pillars, and how they might make a difference to individual Muslims and to the Muslim community (Ummah). Investigate how they are practised by Muslims in Britain today. Consider what beliefs, practices and values are significant in pupils’ lives. • Talk about the Shahadah (‘There is no god except Allah’) and use the 99 names of Allah to explore the attributes of God. Make links with belief in tawhid. Explore Islamic art, looking at shape, pattern, colour and calligraphy. Ask: what is their significance for Muslims, in the context of tawhid? (NB link with Key Question L2.1.) • Consider the importance of the Holy Qur’an for Muslims: how it was revealed to the Prophet Muhammad, how it is used, treated, learnt. Share examples of stories and teaching, e.g. Surah 1, Al-Fatihah (The Opening); Surah 17 (the Prophet’s Night Journey). Find out about people who memorise the Qur’an and why (hafiz, hafiza). • Find out about the difference between the authority of the Qur’an and other forms of guidance for Muslims: Sunnah (practices, customs and traditions of the Prophet Muhammad); Hadith (sayings and actions of the Prophet Muhammad). • Reflect on what forms of guidance pupils turn to when they need guidance or advice, and examine ways in which these are different from the Qur’an for Muslims. • Investigate the design and purpose of a mosque/masjid and explain how and why the architecture and activities, such as preparing for prayer, reflect Muslim beliefs.

 

Key Question U2.7 What matters most to Christians and Humanists? The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own.

Strand / Questions/ Religions

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Strand: Living Recommended Y6 Questions in this thread: 1.8 How should we care for others and the world, and why does it matter? L2.9 What can we learn from religions about deciding right and wrong? 3.10 Does religion help people to be good? Religions and worldviews Christians and non-religious, eg Humanists

Teachers will enable pupils to be able to achieve some of these outcomes, as appropriate to their age and stage: Emerging: • Identify the values found in stories and texts (A2). • Suggest ideas about why humans can be both good and bad, making links with Christian ideas (B3). Expected: • Describe what Christians mean about humans being made in the image of God and being ‘fallen’, giving examples (A2). • Describe some Christian and Humanist values simply (B3). • Express their own ideas about some big moral concepts, such as fairness, honesty etc., comparing them with the ideas of others they have studied (C3). • Suggest reasons why it might be helpful to follow a moral code and why it might be difficult, offering different points of view (B2). Exceeding: • Give examples of similarities and differences between Christian and Humanist values (B3). • Apply ideas about what really matters in life for themselves, including ideas about fairness, freedom, truth, peace, in the light of their learning (C2).

• Talk about what kinds of behaviour and actions pupils think of as bad (examples from films, books, TV as well as real life). Rank some of these ideas – which are the worst, and which are less bad? Why? • Reflect on the question: why do people do good things and bad things? Are we all a mixture of good and bad? Explore pupils’ answers. Make a link with Christian belief about humans being made in the image of God (Genesis 1:28) and also sinful (the ‘Fall’ in Genesis 3). Why do Christians think this is a good explanation of why humans are good and bad? • Talk about how having a ‘code for living’ might help people to be good. • Look at a Humanist ‘code for living’, e.g. Be honest; Use your mind; Tell the truth; Do to other people what you would like them to do to you. How would this help people to behave? What would a Humanist class, school or town look like? • Explore the meanings of some big moral concepts, e.g. fairness, freedom, truth, honesty, kindness, peace. What do they look like in everyday life? • Christian codes for living can be summed up in Jesus’ two rules, love God and love your neighbour. Explore in detail how Jesus expects his followers to behave through the story of the good Samaritan (Luke 10:25–37) and Jesus’ attitude on the cross (Luke 23:32–35). Jesus talks about actions as fruit. What does he mean? If a person’s intentions are bad, can their actions produce good fruit? • Discuss what matters most, e.g. by ranking, sorting and ordering a list of ‘valuable things’: family / friends / Xbox / pets / God / food / being safe / being clever / being beautiful / being good / sport / music / worship / love / honesty / human beings. Get pupils to consider why they hold the values which they do, and how these values make a difference to their lives. • Consider some direct questions about values: is peace more valuable than money? Is love more important than freedom? Is thinking bad thoughts as bad as acting upon them? • Notice and think about the fact that values can clash, and that doing the right thing can be difficult. How do pupils decide for themselves?

 

Key Question U2.8: What difference does it make to believe in Ahimsa (harmlessness), Grace, and Ummah (community)? The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own.

Strand / Questions/ Religions

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 (intended to enable pupils to achieve end of key stage outcomes)

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Strand: Living Recommended Y6 Questions in this thread: 1.8 How should we care for others and the world, and why does it matter? 3.11 What difference does it make to believe in…? Religions and worldviews studied here: Hindus, Christians, Muslims

Teachers will enable pupils to be able to achieve some of these outcomes, as appropriate to their age and stage: Emerging: • Describe what Ahimsa, Grace or Ummah mean to religious people (A1). • Respond sensitively to examples of religious practice with ideas of their own (B2). Expected: • Make connections between beliefs and behaviour in different religions (A1). • Outline the challenges of being a Hindu, Christian or Muslim in Britain today (B2). • Make connections between belief in ahimsa, grace and Ummah, teachings and sources of wisdom in the three religions (A1). • Consider similarities and differences between beliefs and behaviour in different faiths (B3). Exceeding: • Explain similarities in ways in which key beliefs make a difference to life in two or three religions (A1). • Consider and evaluate the significance of the three key ideas studied, in relation to their own ideas (B3).

Discover and think about the meanings of some key ideas in three religions, building on prior learning: • Learn that for Hindus being harmless means, for example, no violence, eating no meat and wearing no leather; find out how ahimsa links to ideas of karma and reincarnation. • Find out about how Gandhi practised ahimsa in the liberation of India; if people believed in ahimsa, what difference would it make to farming, supermarkets, your meals, community relations, international relations? Why doesn’t everybody believe in being harmless? • Learn that for Christians the idea of grace from God means that God loves people unconditionally and is willing to offer forgiveness to anyone for anything. Find out how this is illustrated by the story of the forgiving father/lost son (Luke 15: 11–32). • Make links between the idea of grace, Christian belief in Jesus’ death and resurrection as an expression of God’s love, and Christian forgiveness today (Luke 23:34, John 3:16, 1 John 1:7–9). • Ask some Christians about what they understand by grace from God, and find out what difference it makes to their lives. If they believe God forgives them for anything, does that mean that it doesn’t matter if they do bad things? • Learn that for Muslims, the worldwide Muslim community is called the Ummah, and being part of the Ummah is expressed, e.g. in pilgrimage to Makkah and in shared welfare through zakat. • Explore the impact of the practice of zakat and hajj on Muslims, locally, in the UK and globally. • Ask good questions about these three key concepts and find out some answers to them. • Discuss and consider the impact of ahimsa, grace and Ummah: if we all followed these ideas, how would life change? • Make links between the three concepts: how are they similar and how different? Which has most impact and why? Weigh up the value and impact of these key ideas for themselves.